Estrogenic and Anti-estrogenic Activity Present in Wastewater Effluent and Reclaimed Water

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195538
Title:
Estrogenic and Anti-estrogenic Activity Present in Wastewater Effluent and Reclaimed Water
Author:
Conroy, Otakuye
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Water demand in the semiarid southwestern United States is approachingsustainable limits. Treated wastewater is frequently the last major untapped waterresource. Secondary effluent contains traces of hormones and other endocrine disruptingcontaminants. In Tucson, the vast majority of treated wastewater is either discharged tothe Santa Cruz River (which would otherwise be dry for 10-11 months of the year, orinfiltrated for groundwater recharge at the Sweetwater Recharge Facility (SRF). Soilaquifertreatment at the SRF is relied upon to polish effluent prior to its recoveryand reuse for landscape irrigation.There were three primary venues for the study described here: (i) the Roger RoadWastewater Treatment Plant (RRWTP), (ii) the SRF, and (iii) the Santa Cruz River.Secondary treatment at the RRWTP lowered the estrogenic activity of wastewater(influent to effluent) by 35-60 percent. Residual estrogenic activity in RRWTP effluentdecreased to near zero over a 24-hr detention period in the SRF infiltration basins, whileanti-estrogenic activity increased over the same period. Water collected from theunderlying unconfined aquifer, however, was again estrogenic, probably due to theselective removal of anti-estrogens during percolation.In the effluent-dependent Santa Cruz River, estrogenic activity decreasedcontinuously from the plant outfalls to a point about 25 miles downstream whereestrogenic activity reached the limit of detection. A corresponding increase in antiestrogenicactivity was evident. Monitoring wells along the stream produced levels of24estrogenic activity that were related to the fraction of wastewater effluent in respectivesamples (determined by the boron isotope ratio).The yeast estrogen screen (YES) procedure was modified by lysing the yeast afterreporter gene expression to establish the dependence of bioassay response on dyetransport kinetics. It was determined that β-galactosidase remains primarily inside thecell throughout the normal YES procedure. Furthermore, the rate of color developmentwas sensitive to trans-membrane transport of the dye substrate as well as the estrogencontent of the waters tested. The modified (LYES) procedure was capable of detectingboth estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activity in samples from effluent dependent streams.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Environmental Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Arnold, Robert G.
Committee Chair:
Arnold, Robert G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleEstrogenic and Anti-estrogenic Activity Present in Wastewater Effluent and Reclaimed Wateren_US
dc.creatorConroy, Otakuyeen_US
dc.contributor.authorConroy, Otakuyeen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWater demand in the semiarid southwestern United States is approachingsustainable limits. Treated wastewater is frequently the last major untapped waterresource. Secondary effluent contains traces of hormones and other endocrine disruptingcontaminants. In Tucson, the vast majority of treated wastewater is either discharged tothe Santa Cruz River (which would otherwise be dry for 10-11 months of the year, orinfiltrated for groundwater recharge at the Sweetwater Recharge Facility (SRF). Soilaquifertreatment at the SRF is relied upon to polish effluent prior to its recoveryand reuse for landscape irrigation.There were three primary venues for the study described here: (i) the Roger RoadWastewater Treatment Plant (RRWTP), (ii) the SRF, and (iii) the Santa Cruz River.Secondary treatment at the RRWTP lowered the estrogenic activity of wastewater(influent to effluent) by 35-60 percent. Residual estrogenic activity in RRWTP effluentdecreased to near zero over a 24-hr detention period in the SRF infiltration basins, whileanti-estrogenic activity increased over the same period. Water collected from theunderlying unconfined aquifer, however, was again estrogenic, probably due to theselective removal of anti-estrogens during percolation.In the effluent-dependent Santa Cruz River, estrogenic activity decreasedcontinuously from the plant outfalls to a point about 25 miles downstream whereestrogenic activity reached the limit of detection. A corresponding increase in antiestrogenicactivity was evident. Monitoring wells along the stream produced levels of24estrogenic activity that were related to the fraction of wastewater effluent in respectivesamples (determined by the boron isotope ratio).The yeast estrogen screen (YES) procedure was modified by lysing the yeast afterreporter gene expression to establish the dependence of bioassay response on dyetransport kinetics. It was determined that β-galactosidase remains primarily inside thecell throughout the normal YES procedure. Furthermore, the rate of color developmentwas sensitive to trans-membrane transport of the dye substrate as well as the estrogencontent of the waters tested. The modified (LYES) procedure was capable of detectingboth estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activity in samples from effluent dependent streams.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorArnold, Robert G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairArnold, Robert G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberQuanrud, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaez, Eduardoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1800en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747562en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.