Kids and Computers: The Interactions and Attitudes of Girls and Boys with Technology

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195535
Title:
Kids and Computers: The Interactions and Attitudes of Girls and Boys with Technology
Author:
Connolly, Sonya Nicole
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation study examines computer use by second graders in an affluent, suburban community to determine how boys and girls view and participate with computers at home and in an educational setting. This qualitative study examined the students' time spent with computers, software choices, perceptions of technology now and in the future, their computer skills and their perceptions of their skills and the influence of parents through the use of interviews, observations, logs, surveys and artifact collection.The findings from this research demonstrate that there were no drastic differences in the amount of time boys and girls spent on computers at home and at school. In terms of software choices, all students favored games to other types of software. However, girls were more likely to favor games that were less competitive and boys tended to favor sports games. The parents in this study had primarily positive perceptions of the role of computers in their children's lives and the students felt that their parents supported their computer use.Additionally, this study reveals that while all students were able to meet most of the school district's technology frameworks, better assessment tools need to be created to truly capture the richness of what students are able to do with computers and to encourage them to use the computer in thought provoking ways that emphasize more than just skills. Finally, students of both genders were able to envision multiple uses for computers now and in the future.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Language, Reading & Culture
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleKids and Computers: The Interactions and Attitudes of Girls and Boys with Technologyen_US
dc.creatorConnolly, Sonya Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, Sonya Nicoleen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation study examines computer use by second graders in an affluent, suburban community to determine how boys and girls view and participate with computers at home and in an educational setting. This qualitative study examined the students' time spent with computers, software choices, perceptions of technology now and in the future, their computer skills and their perceptions of their skills and the influence of parents through the use of interviews, observations, logs, surveys and artifact collection.The findings from this research demonstrate that there were no drastic differences in the amount of time boys and girls spent on computers at home and at school. In terms of software choices, all students favored games to other types of software. However, girls were more likely to favor games that were less competitive and boys tended to favor sports games. The parents in this study had primarily positive perceptions of the role of computers in their children's lives and the students felt that their parents supported their computer use.Additionally, this study reveals that while all students were able to meet most of the school district's technology frameworks, better assessment tools need to be created to truly capture the richness of what students are able to do with computers and to encourage them to use the computer in thought provoking ways that emphasize more than just skills. Finally, students of both genders were able to envision multiple uses for computers now and in the future.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberValmont, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetts, J. Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355070en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.