State, Migrants and the Production of Extra-Territorial Spaces: Negotiating Israeli Citizenship in the Diaspora

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195529
Title:
State, Migrants and the Production of Extra-Territorial Spaces: Negotiating Israeli Citizenship in the Diaspora
Author:
Cohen, Nir
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The current research examines the relationship between the Israeli state and its migrant community in the United States. It argues that under conditions of accelerated globalization, the Israeli state has sought to reach out and re-territorialize its migrants' identities in order to strengthen their territory-based Israeli identity and, ultimately, return them to Israel. Focusing on the role played by cultural practices in the process of reterritorialization - which takes place in newly created extra-territorial spaces - it argues that a new type of transnational contract, namely diasporic citizenship has emerged that defines the relationship between the state and its citizens abroad. Cultural practices from above (state-produced) re-assert migrants' identities as national subjects and include them in the expanding incorporation regime of the Israeli state. At the same time, cultural practices from below (migrants'-produced) have been instrumental in their quest to (re)- imagine themselves as part of a trans-territorial Israeli nation. The research uses the Israel Independence Day Festival in Los Angeles to examine the extent to which it has become an extra-territorial space where state officials and migrants negotiate their often conflicting notions of Israeli culture, identity, and citizenship. It is this continuous process of negotiation, the research concludes that (re)-produces new types of affiliations between the state and its subjects overseas
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Transnational Migration; Citizenship; State; Israel; Diaspora
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marston, Sallie A
Committee Chair:
Marston, Sallie A

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleState, Migrants and the Production of Extra-Territorial Spaces: Negotiating Israeli Citizenship in the Diasporaen_US
dc.creatorCohen, Niren_US
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Niren_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe current research examines the relationship between the Israeli state and its migrant community in the United States. It argues that under conditions of accelerated globalization, the Israeli state has sought to reach out and re-territorialize its migrants' identities in order to strengthen their territory-based Israeli identity and, ultimately, return them to Israel. Focusing on the role played by cultural practices in the process of reterritorialization - which takes place in newly created extra-territorial spaces - it argues that a new type of transnational contract, namely diasporic citizenship has emerged that defines the relationship between the state and its citizens abroad. Cultural practices from above (state-produced) re-assert migrants' identities as national subjects and include them in the expanding incorporation regime of the Israeli state. At the same time, cultural practices from below (migrants'-produced) have been instrumental in their quest to (re)- imagine themselves as part of a trans-territorial Israeli nation. The research uses the Israel Independence Day Festival in Los Angeles to examine the extent to which it has become an extra-territorial space where state officials and migrants negotiate their often conflicting notions of Israeli culture, identity, and citizenship. It is this continuous process of negotiation, the research concludes that (re)-produces new types of affiliations between the state and its subjects overseasen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectTransnational Migrationen_US
dc.subjectCitizenshipen_US
dc.subjectStateen_US
dc.subjectIsraelen_US
dc.subjectDiasporaen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarston, Sallie Aen_US
dc.contributor.chairMarston, Sallie Aen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMitchneck, Beth A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, John Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCornell, Stephenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2642en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749636en_US
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