Enhancing Retention of Foster Parents: The Role of Motivational Interviewing

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195528
Title:
Enhancing Retention of Foster Parents: The Role of Motivational Interviewing
Author:
Cohen, Julie Laura
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
About half of new foster parents quit fostering in their first year, which contributes to the national shortage of foster parents. The purpose of this longitudinal project was to implement and then evaluate a brief motivational interviewing (MI) intervention for new foster parents to support them in their transition to foster parenting. The study participants are a community sample of 112 new foster parents, half of whom were randomly selected to receive two sessions of MI and half of whom served as a control group. The goal was to improve the retention rates and the quality of the fostering experience of new foster parents, but the result was that neither retention nor quality of experience was different between the MI and control groups. Ambivalence about fostering was reduced in the MI group, and the MI group's commitment to fostering was greater than the control group's commitment by the one-year follow-up. A somewhat surprising observation was that only 47 of the 78 families in the study actually got licensed during the one-year study period, and it took participants about 125 days, on average, to get licensed. This suggests that licensing is taking too long and that many participants, without support and encouragement along the way, are abandoning the idea of fostering before they even begin. The results from this study are mixed and somewhat inconclusive, but what is evident is that more support and guidance for new foster parents is surely needed. Further study is warranted to try to create a more effective intervention to support new foster parents.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Psychology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sechrest, Lee
Committee Chair:
Sechrest, Lee; Arkowitz, Harold S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEnhancing Retention of Foster Parents: The Role of Motivational Interviewingen_US
dc.creatorCohen, Julie Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Julie Lauraen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAbout half of new foster parents quit fostering in their first year, which contributes to the national shortage of foster parents. The purpose of this longitudinal project was to implement and then evaluate a brief motivational interviewing (MI) intervention for new foster parents to support them in their transition to foster parenting. The study participants are a community sample of 112 new foster parents, half of whom were randomly selected to receive two sessions of MI and half of whom served as a control group. The goal was to improve the retention rates and the quality of the fostering experience of new foster parents, but the result was that neither retention nor quality of experience was different between the MI and control groups. Ambivalence about fostering was reduced in the MI group, and the MI group's commitment to fostering was greater than the control group's commitment by the one-year follow-up. A somewhat surprising observation was that only 47 of the 78 families in the study actually got licensed during the one-year study period, and it took participants about 125 days, on average, to get licensed. This suggests that licensing is taking too long and that many participants, without support and encouragement along the way, are abandoning the idea of fostering before they even begin. The results from this study are mixed and somewhat inconclusive, but what is evident is that more support and guidance for new foster parents is surely needed. Further study is warranted to try to create a more effective intervention to support new foster parents.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.chairSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.chairArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSbarra, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShoham, Vardaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11159en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261013en_US
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