A Shadow Underneath: The Secret History of Paranoia, Borders and Terrorism in Postwar American Literature and Film

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195525
Title:
A Shadow Underneath: The Secret History of Paranoia, Borders and Terrorism in Postwar American Literature and Film
Author:
Cobb, Sean Daren
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
"The Secret History of Paranoia, Borders and Terrorism in American Postwar Literature and Film" explores the historical re-articulations of paranoia around the problems of borders and terrorism. The introduction discusses the first English definition of "paranoia" in 1811 - "alienation of mind" and "defect in judgment" - by comparing this definition to other early psychological taxonomies of paranoia and arguing that "paranoia" is a border concept. The first chapter analyzes U.S. postwar nationalism, border paranoia and fears of collapsing nation-state sovereignty in Anthony Mann's 1949 film Border Incident, a semi-documentary film noir focusing on illegal bracero smuggling in Imperial Valley, California. The second chapter analyzes Paco Ignacio Taibo's border detective fiction, specifically Frontera Dreams, Leonardo's Bicycle and Life Itself, as an allegory for postmodern identity. The third chapter analyzes the novel and film Flashpoint, a story about two border patrol agents who find a buried skeleton at the border that they discover later is J.F.K.'s assassin, arguing that the J.F.K. conspiracy substitutes for and, ultimately, replaces the actual conspiracy of border corruption and the illegal exploitation of immigrant workers. The fourth and final chapter situates Don DeLillo's fiction, the film and novel Children of Men and Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer and States of Exception within the fall of Cold War nation states and borders, charting the rise of terrorism as a permanent "state of exception" and as the dark side of globalization, modernization and secular society.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
White, Susan
Committee Chair:
White, Susan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Shadow Underneath: The Secret History of Paranoia, Borders and Terrorism in Postwar American Literature and Filmen_US
dc.creatorCobb, Sean Darenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCobb, Sean Darenen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstract"The Secret History of Paranoia, Borders and Terrorism in American Postwar Literature and Film" explores the historical re-articulations of paranoia around the problems of borders and terrorism. The introduction discusses the first English definition of "paranoia" in 1811 - "alienation of mind" and "defect in judgment" - by comparing this definition to other early psychological taxonomies of paranoia and arguing that "paranoia" is a border concept. The first chapter analyzes U.S. postwar nationalism, border paranoia and fears of collapsing nation-state sovereignty in Anthony Mann's 1949 film Border Incident, a semi-documentary film noir focusing on illegal bracero smuggling in Imperial Valley, California. The second chapter analyzes Paco Ignacio Taibo's border detective fiction, specifically Frontera Dreams, Leonardo's Bicycle and Life Itself, as an allegory for postmodern identity. The third chapter analyzes the novel and film Flashpoint, a story about two border patrol agents who find a buried skeleton at the border that they discover later is J.F.K.'s assassin, arguing that the J.F.K. conspiracy substitutes for and, ultimately, replaces the actual conspiracy of border corruption and the illegal exploitation of immigrant workers. The fourth and final chapter situates Don DeLillo's fiction, the film and novel Children of Men and Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer and States of Exception within the fall of Cold War nation states and borders, charting the rise of terrorism as a permanent "state of exception" and as the dark side of globalization, modernization and secular society.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWhite, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.chairWhite, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBertsch, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGallego, Carlosen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2461en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748452en_US
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