Extreme flooding in the Dolores River Basin, Colorado and Utah: insights from paleofloods, geochronology and hydroclimatic analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195522
Title:
Extreme flooding in the Dolores River Basin, Colorado and Utah: insights from paleofloods, geochronology and hydroclimatic analysis
Author:
Cline, Michael Logan
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The complex hydroclimatic response of the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) to climate circulation patterns and their descriptive indices creates significant challenges to water managers, especially given the uncertain future of the climate. This dissertation addresses fundamental questions that surround extreme flooding in the UCRB by combining paleoflood field techniques, two analytical geochronology techniques and several numerical climate data analysis techniques. The three manuscripts included in this dissertation focus on the Dolores River Basin (DRB), a sub-basin within the UCRB in order to answer theoretical questions about the timing and climate patterns associated with extreme floods.It has become widely accepted that extreme flooding in the Lower Colorado River Basin (LCRB) is linked to a period when the frequency and intensity of El Nino periods was higher. Within the UCRB, and more specifically, the DRB, the linkages are less clear. The paleoflood chronology that we developed indicates that the peak episodes of flooding in the DRB occurred between roughly 300 A.D. and 1200 A.D. This period of flooding is out of phase with many floods in the LCRB, whose peak floods dominantly clustered in the last 700 years; a period of time coincident with the termination of large floods in the DRB. The chronology that I developed utilizes accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon (AMS 14C) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to provide a detailed flood history, highlighting the importance of utilizing independent age control. Alternative, or less accurate chronologies would have resulted had we used AMS 14C or OSL alone, suggesting that some previously studied basins may have incorrect chronologies. The detailed flood chronology of this study has subsequently allowed us to contextualize extreme floods relative to middle--late Holocene climate variability.In an effort to provide a hydroclimatic context for flooding in the DRB, numerical analyses were applied to contemporary climate and streamflow data in order to identify the possible mechanisms that modulate precipitation and streamflow in the Western U.S. and more specifically, the DRB. Results from these techniques indicate that the DRB maintains a complex response to a major North Pacific, low-frequency circulation pattern. The North Pacific circulation modulates the low-frequency component of the DRB's precipitation and flooding, although the high frequency modulation remains very poorly characterized.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
climate; flood; luminescence; paleoflood; PDO
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Baker, Victor R.; Woodhouse, Connie
Committee Chair:
Baker, Victor R.; Woodhouse, Connie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExtreme flooding in the Dolores River Basin, Colorado and Utah: insights from paleofloods, geochronology and hydroclimatic analysisen_US
dc.creatorCline, Michael Loganen_US
dc.contributor.authorCline, Michael Loganen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe complex hydroclimatic response of the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) to climate circulation patterns and their descriptive indices creates significant challenges to water managers, especially given the uncertain future of the climate. This dissertation addresses fundamental questions that surround extreme flooding in the UCRB by combining paleoflood field techniques, two analytical geochronology techniques and several numerical climate data analysis techniques. The three manuscripts included in this dissertation focus on the Dolores River Basin (DRB), a sub-basin within the UCRB in order to answer theoretical questions about the timing and climate patterns associated with extreme floods.It has become widely accepted that extreme flooding in the Lower Colorado River Basin (LCRB) is linked to a period when the frequency and intensity of El Nino periods was higher. Within the UCRB, and more specifically, the DRB, the linkages are less clear. The paleoflood chronology that we developed indicates that the peak episodes of flooding in the DRB occurred between roughly 300 A.D. and 1200 A.D. This period of flooding is out of phase with many floods in the LCRB, whose peak floods dominantly clustered in the last 700 years; a period of time coincident with the termination of large floods in the DRB. The chronology that I developed utilizes accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon (AMS 14C) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to provide a detailed flood history, highlighting the importance of utilizing independent age control. Alternative, or less accurate chronologies would have resulted had we used AMS 14C or OSL alone, suggesting that some previously studied basins may have incorrect chronologies. The detailed flood chronology of this study has subsequently allowed us to contextualize extreme floods relative to middle--late Holocene climate variability.In an effort to provide a hydroclimatic context for flooding in the DRB, numerical analyses were applied to contemporary climate and streamflow data in order to identify the possible mechanisms that modulate precipitation and streamflow in the Western U.S. and more specifically, the DRB. Results from these techniques indicate that the DRB maintains a complex response to a major North Pacific, low-frequency circulation pattern. The North Pacific circulation modulates the low-frequency component of the DRB's precipitation and flooding, although the high frequency modulation remains very poorly characterized.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectclimateen_US
dc.subjectflooden_US
dc.subjectluminescenceen_US
dc.subjectpaleoflooden_US
dc.subjectPDOen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBaker, Victor R.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodhouse, Connieen_US
dc.contributor.chairBaker, Victor R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWoodhouse, Connieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaker, Victor R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWoodhouse, Connieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYool, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirschboeck, Katieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11332en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261187en_US
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