Self-Efficacy, Locus of Control, and Social Attitudes: Generation Media Responds to Teacher Commentary

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195520
Title:
Self-Efficacy, Locus of Control, and Social Attitudes: Generation Media Responds to Teacher Commentary
Author:
Clayton, Erica Reynolds
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In an effort to understand the ways that students perceive teacher commentary on their papers, I constructed and employed a study in the fall of 2000, sponsored by both the Council of Writing Program Administrators and the National Council for Teachers of English The study involved four trained graduate instructors from The University of Arizona English Department and approximately twenty-five, first-year composition students from a section belonging to each instructor. Specifically, I was curious about the ways that formative evaluation, that is, teacher commentary provided during the drafting stage of the writing process, affected students during their writing processes from a cognitive, emotive, and behavioral perspective. In other words, I was asking if students: (1) understood teacher comments as they were intended; (2) whether certain comments evoked positive or negative emotion in students; (3) based on the comments provided did students choose to revise; and (4) if students did choose to revise, why did they do so and in what way?Questions concerning the way teacher commentary affects students are important ones to ask because the ways that students are affected by feedback can also affect their perception of their abilities and their willingness to perform a task in the future. Equally of import is questioning the way a student comes to the teacher's text. Social psychologists suggest that one's state of mind upon receiving feedback inform the ways in which the feedback received. And finally, it is believed that isolated demographic populations, thanks to the stimuli and mores of their particular era and environment, may react to feedback from authority figures in surprising but similar ways.My research uncovers that students' self-efficacy and perceived locus of control, both tenets of social and cognitive psychology, indeed influence the way that they perceive teacher commentary and the way that they respond behaviorally through revision practices. I also suggest that contemporary students, deluged by media and entertainment, may not be responsive to teacher commentary, especially when it is perceived as negative in ways that writing teachers might not anticipate.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Mountford, Roxanne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSelf-Efficacy, Locus of Control, and Social Attitudes: Generation Media Responds to Teacher Commentaryen_US
dc.creatorClayton, Erica Reynoldsen_US
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Erica Reynoldsen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn an effort to understand the ways that students perceive teacher commentary on their papers, I constructed and employed a study in the fall of 2000, sponsored by both the Council of Writing Program Administrators and the National Council for Teachers of English The study involved four trained graduate instructors from The University of Arizona English Department and approximately twenty-five, first-year composition students from a section belonging to each instructor. Specifically, I was curious about the ways that formative evaluation, that is, teacher commentary provided during the drafting stage of the writing process, affected students during their writing processes from a cognitive, emotive, and behavioral perspective. In other words, I was asking if students: (1) understood teacher comments as they were intended; (2) whether certain comments evoked positive or negative emotion in students; (3) based on the comments provided did students choose to revise; and (4) if students did choose to revise, why did they do so and in what way?Questions concerning the way teacher commentary affects students are important ones to ask because the ways that students are affected by feedback can also affect their perception of their abilities and their willingness to perform a task in the future. Equally of import is questioning the way a student comes to the teacher's text. Social psychologists suggest that one's state of mind upon receiving feedback inform the ways in which the feedback received. And finally, it is believed that isolated demographic populations, thanks to the stimuli and mores of their particular era and environment, may react to feedback from authority figures in surprising but similar ways.My research uncovers that students' self-efficacy and perceived locus of control, both tenets of social and cognitive psychology, indeed influence the way that they perceive teacher commentary and the way that they respond behaviorally through revision practices. I also suggest that contemporary students, deluged by media and entertainment, may not be responsive to teacher commentary, especially when it is perceived as negative in ways that writing teachers might not anticipate.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMountford, Roxanneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMountford, Roxanneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Edward M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2150en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747348en_US
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