The Organized Melee: Emergence of Collective Behavior in Concentrated Suspensions of Swimming Bacteria and Associated Phenomena

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195513
Title:
The Organized Melee: Emergence of Collective Behavior in Concentrated Suspensions of Swimming Bacteria and Associated Phenomena
Author:
Cisneros, Luis
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Suspensions of the aerobic bacteria {\it Bacilus subtilis} develop patterns and flows from the interplay of motility, chemotaxis and buoyancy.In sessile drops, such bioconvectively driven flows carry plumes down the slanted meniscus and concentrate cells at the drop edge, while in pendant drops such self-concentration occurs at the bottom.These dynamics are explained quantitatively by a mathematical model consisting of oxygen diffusion and consumption, chemotaxis, and viscous fluid dynamics.Concentrated regions in both geometries comprise nearly close-packed populations, forming the collective ``Zooming BioNematic'' (ZBN) phase.This state exhibits large-scale orientational coherence, analogous to the molecular alignment of nematic liquid crystals, coupled with remarkable spatial and temporal correlations of velocity and vorticity, as measured by both novel and standard applications of particle imaging velocimetry.To probe mechanisms leading to this phase, response of individual cells to steric stress was explored, finding that they can reverse swimming direction at spatial constrictions without turning the cell body.The consequences of this propensity to flip the flagella are quantified, showing that "forwards" and "backwards" motion are dynamically and morphologically indistinguishable.Finally, experiments and mathematical modeling show that complex flows driven by previously unknown bipolar flagellar arrangements are induced when {\it B. subtilis} are confined in a thin layer of fluid, between asymmetric boundaries.The resulting driven flow circulates around the cell body ranging over several cell diameters, in contrast to the more localized flows surrounding free swimmers.This discovery extends our knowledge of the dynamic geometry of bacteria and their flagella, and reveals new mechanisms for motility-associated molecular transport and inter-cellular communication.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Bacterial Motility; Bio-Fluid dynamics; Biofilms; Collective Behavior; Pattern Formation; Self Propelled Particles
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goldstein, Raymond E.
Committee Chair:
Goldstein, Raymond E.; Kessler, John O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Organized Melee: Emergence of Collective Behavior in Concentrated Suspensions of Swimming Bacteria and Associated Phenomenaen_US
dc.creatorCisneros, Luisen_US
dc.contributor.authorCisneros, Luisen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSuspensions of the aerobic bacteria {\it Bacilus subtilis} develop patterns and flows from the interplay of motility, chemotaxis and buoyancy.In sessile drops, such bioconvectively driven flows carry plumes down the slanted meniscus and concentrate cells at the drop edge, while in pendant drops such self-concentration occurs at the bottom.These dynamics are explained quantitatively by a mathematical model consisting of oxygen diffusion and consumption, chemotaxis, and viscous fluid dynamics.Concentrated regions in both geometries comprise nearly close-packed populations, forming the collective ``Zooming BioNematic'' (ZBN) phase.This state exhibits large-scale orientational coherence, analogous to the molecular alignment of nematic liquid crystals, coupled with remarkable spatial and temporal correlations of velocity and vorticity, as measured by both novel and standard applications of particle imaging velocimetry.To probe mechanisms leading to this phase, response of individual cells to steric stress was explored, finding that they can reverse swimming direction at spatial constrictions without turning the cell body.The consequences of this propensity to flip the flagella are quantified, showing that "forwards" and "backwards" motion are dynamically and morphologically indistinguishable.Finally, experiments and mathematical modeling show that complex flows driven by previously unknown bipolar flagellar arrangements are induced when {\it B. subtilis} are confined in a thin layer of fluid, between asymmetric boundaries.The resulting driven flow circulates around the cell body ranging over several cell diameters, in contrast to the more localized flows surrounding free swimmers.This discovery extends our knowledge of the dynamic geometry of bacteria and their flagella, and reveals new mechanisms for motility-associated molecular transport and inter-cellular communication.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBacterial Motilityen_US
dc.subjectBio-Fluid dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectBiofilmsen_US
dc.subjectCollective Behavioren_US
dc.subjectPattern Formationen_US
dc.subjectSelf Propelled Particlesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoldstein, Raymond E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGoldstein, Raymond E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairKessler, John O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPsaltis, Dimitriosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVisscher, Cohenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCronin, Alexen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10168en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750754en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.