OVER-TIRED AND UNDER CONTROL? SLEEP DEPRIVATION, RESOURCE DEPLETION, AND WORKPLACE DEVIANCE

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195501
Title:
OVER-TIRED AND UNDER CONTROL? SLEEP DEPRIVATION, RESOURCE DEPLETION, AND WORKPLACE DEVIANCE
Author:
Christian, Michael Schlatter
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Organizations are increasingly devoting interest towards understanding the causes of workplace deviance behaviors, which include interpersonal aggression, theft, violence, vandalism and sabotage. These behaviors are particularly relevant to organizations, in that the yearly losses due to theft are estimated at over 40 billion dollars for U.S. businesses (Coffin, 2003), and acts of workplace deviance could cost as much as 200 billion dollars annually (Murphy, 1993).In this research, I integrated theoretical perspectives from psychology and organizational behavior with neurocognitive evidence in order to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on workplace deviance behavior. In particular, I argue that cognitive resource theories offer explanatory power for the proposed linkage between sleep loss and deviant behaviors. Specifically, sleep deprivation was expected to reduce cognitive capacity and self-regulatory ability, and as a result decrease individuals' self-control, increase hostility, and impair moral decisions, which would in turn increase workplace deviance. Finally, proposed methods are presented for two studies. The first study utilized a field sample of shiftworkers with irregular sleep schedules (i.e., nurses). The second study utilized a lab sample of university students who were subjected to sleep deprivation conditions in a controlled environment.Results largely supported the model in both samples, with the exception of moral reasoning, which was unrelated to sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation affected self-control and hostility, which were in turn related to deviance, with the exception of self-control and interpersonal deviance in Study 2.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cognitve resources; Hostility; Self control; Sleep deprivation; Workplace deviance
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ellis, Aleksander P.J.
Committee Chair:
Ellis, Aleksander P.J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOVER-TIRED AND UNDER CONTROL? SLEEP DEPRIVATION, RESOURCE DEPLETION, AND WORKPLACE DEVIANCEen_US
dc.creatorChristian, Michael Schlatteren_US
dc.contributor.authorChristian, Michael Schlatteren_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOrganizations are increasingly devoting interest towards understanding the causes of workplace deviance behaviors, which include interpersonal aggression, theft, violence, vandalism and sabotage. These behaviors are particularly relevant to organizations, in that the yearly losses due to theft are estimated at over 40 billion dollars for U.S. businesses (Coffin, 2003), and acts of workplace deviance could cost as much as 200 billion dollars annually (Murphy, 1993).In this research, I integrated theoretical perspectives from psychology and organizational behavior with neurocognitive evidence in order to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on workplace deviance behavior. In particular, I argue that cognitive resource theories offer explanatory power for the proposed linkage between sleep loss and deviant behaviors. Specifically, sleep deprivation was expected to reduce cognitive capacity and self-regulatory ability, and as a result decrease individuals' self-control, increase hostility, and impair moral decisions, which would in turn increase workplace deviance. Finally, proposed methods are presented for two studies. The first study utilized a field sample of shiftworkers with irregular sleep schedules (i.e., nurses). The second study utilized a lab sample of university students who were subjected to sleep deprivation conditions in a controlled environment.Results largely supported the model in both samples, with the exception of moral reasoning, which was unrelated to sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation affected self-control and hostility, which were in turn related to deviance, with the exception of self-control and interpersonal deviance in Study 2.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCognitve resourcesen_US
dc.subjectHostilityen_US
dc.subjectSelf controlen_US
dc.subjectSleep deprivationen_US
dc.subjectWorkplace devianceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEllis, Aleksander P.J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairEllis, Aleksander P.J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilliland, Stephen W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlaughter, Jerel E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10903en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754789en_US
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