Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195444
Title:
Development of In Vitro Three-Dimensional Microvascular Tissues
Author:
Chang, Carlos
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Microvasculatures may become damaged by a variety of acute and chronic diseases. In many cases, microvessel function is irreversibly compromised, leading to the dysfunction and even death of surrounding tissues. Currently, there are few therapies that directly address the treatment of microvascular insufficiency. Responding to this need, researchers are developing methods to fabricate in vitro blood vessels. Typical strategies include; cellular sodding within polymers and/or biopolymers, the formation of cylindrical cellular monolayers around polymer mandrels, and the modification of biocompatible surfaces for cellular adhesion. Using currently available techniques, simple, individual vessel conduits have been engineered with internal diameters down to 150μm. However, no evidence has been provided illustrating the formation of patent, interconnected microvessel networks without the aid of a host circulatory system. In response to this challenge, it is hypothesized that a novel flow-based experimental system will support the in vitro development of three-dimensional microvascular tissues. Addressing this hypothesis, the presented work focused on three specific aims: Specific Aim 1. Pattern planar in vitro three-dimensional microvasculatures. Specific Aim 2. Engineer a Dynamic In vitro Perfusion Chamber (DIP Chamber) for microvascular investigation. Specific Aim 3. In vitro perfusion of microvessel fragments within the DIP Chamber. Through the supporting experiments, directed endothelial sprouting from parent isolated microvessel fragments was achieved. In addition, patent in vitro microvessel networks were successfully developed. The presented experiments are the first to achieve these experimental results. In addition, the described experimental model will provide a unique method for future investigations of microcirculatory phenomena. Since no exogenous growth factors or cell signals were introduced into the constructs, it is believed that this system presents a physiological platform for future investigations into angiogenesis, angioadaptation, and network remodeling. Moreover, this model may offer a useful platform for vascular therapeutic testing and a foundation for future tissue engineering applications.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
tissue engineer microvessels; microvascular engineering; perfusion
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Biomedical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hoying, James B
Committee Chair:
Hoying, James B

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of In Vitro Three-Dimensional Microvascular Tissuesen_US
dc.creatorChang, Carlosen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, Carlosen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMicrovasculatures may become damaged by a variety of acute and chronic diseases. In many cases, microvessel function is irreversibly compromised, leading to the dysfunction and even death of surrounding tissues. Currently, there are few therapies that directly address the treatment of microvascular insufficiency. Responding to this need, researchers are developing methods to fabricate in vitro blood vessels. Typical strategies include; cellular sodding within polymers and/or biopolymers, the formation of cylindrical cellular monolayers around polymer mandrels, and the modification of biocompatible surfaces for cellular adhesion. Using currently available techniques, simple, individual vessel conduits have been engineered with internal diameters down to 150μm. However, no evidence has been provided illustrating the formation of patent, interconnected microvessel networks without the aid of a host circulatory system. In response to this challenge, it is hypothesized that a novel flow-based experimental system will support the in vitro development of three-dimensional microvascular tissues. Addressing this hypothesis, the presented work focused on three specific aims: Specific Aim 1. Pattern planar in vitro three-dimensional microvasculatures. Specific Aim 2. Engineer a Dynamic In vitro Perfusion Chamber (DIP Chamber) for microvascular investigation. Specific Aim 3. In vitro perfusion of microvessel fragments within the DIP Chamber. Through the supporting experiments, directed endothelial sprouting from parent isolated microvessel fragments was achieved. In addition, patent in vitro microvessel networks were successfully developed. The presented experiments are the first to achieve these experimental results. In addition, the described experimental model will provide a unique method for future investigations of microcirculatory phenomena. Since no exogenous growth factors or cell signals were introduced into the constructs, it is believed that this system presents a physiological platform for future investigations into angiogenesis, angioadaptation, and network remodeling. Moreover, this model may offer a useful platform for vascular therapeutic testing and a foundation for future tissue engineering applications.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecttissue engineer microvesselsen_US
dc.subjectmicrovascular engineeringen_US
dc.subjectperfusionen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHoying, James Ben_US
dc.contributor.chairHoying, James Ben_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, Stuart K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSecomb, Timothy W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRiley, Mark R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2555en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748482en_US
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