Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195441
Title:
Linguistic Sequencing in the Cortex and Basal Ganglia
Author:
Chan, Shiao-hui
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Due to the common belief that language is unique to humans, great emphasis has been placed on the neocortex, while the role of the subcortical areas has been minimized. This project used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the linguistic involvement of the basal ganglia (BG). Previous research has demonstrated that the BG are implicated in building up sequences of behavior into meaningful, goal-directed repertoires This study developed the idea of motor sequencing into linguistic sequencing to test the BG's involvement in the abstract sequencing of language. Since past imaging studies failed to present a coherent picture of the BG laterality, which might be due to the absence of the control for subjects' familial handedness background, this subject factor was also investigated.Twenty-four right-handed, neurologically healthy English speakers were recruited. Half of them had left-handed blood relatives (FS+); the other half did not (FS-). Their tasks included 1) linguistic sequencing--reordering phrases into a sentence or reordering words along the general-specific dimension, 2) non-linguistic sequencing--swapping designated phrases/words and 3) repeat--repeating words in their original sequence. Voxel-wise analysis showed that both the BG and cortical areas were activated when subjects performed a reordering task. Region of interest (ROI) analysis demonstrated that the BG were involved in linguistic sequencing (reorder - repeat) and that Broca's area and the caudate head were co-opted in computing hierarchical structure (reorder - swap). Although familial sinistrality did not alter the activation pattern of Broca's area and the caudate head, it played a role in their activation asymmetry: both subject groups had left-lateralization in the inferior frontal gyrus, but they failed to show identical laterality in the BG. A possible explanation based on the direct and indirect pathways in the BG was offered and the laterality discrepancy was attributed to these two groups' different time course of language acquisition.To summarize, this study suggested that the BG, especially the head of the caudate nucleus, were involved in the abstract sequencing of language and that the distinct brain asymmetry associated with different familial sinistrality background might be rooted in the BG.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Sequencing; Basal ganglia; Lateralization; Familial handedness; Language; Imaging
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Linguistics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bever, Thomas G.
Committee Chair:
Bever, Thomas G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLinguistic Sequencing in the Cortex and Basal Gangliaen_US
dc.creatorChan, Shiao-huien_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Shiao-huien_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDue to the common belief that language is unique to humans, great emphasis has been placed on the neocortex, while the role of the subcortical areas has been minimized. This project used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the linguistic involvement of the basal ganglia (BG). Previous research has demonstrated that the BG are implicated in building up sequences of behavior into meaningful, goal-directed repertoires This study developed the idea of motor sequencing into linguistic sequencing to test the BG's involvement in the abstract sequencing of language. Since past imaging studies failed to present a coherent picture of the BG laterality, which might be due to the absence of the control for subjects' familial handedness background, this subject factor was also investigated.Twenty-four right-handed, neurologically healthy English speakers were recruited. Half of them had left-handed blood relatives (FS+); the other half did not (FS-). Their tasks included 1) linguistic sequencing--reordering phrases into a sentence or reordering words along the general-specific dimension, 2) non-linguistic sequencing--swapping designated phrases/words and 3) repeat--repeating words in their original sequence. Voxel-wise analysis showed that both the BG and cortical areas were activated when subjects performed a reordering task. Region of interest (ROI) analysis demonstrated that the BG were involved in linguistic sequencing (reorder - repeat) and that Broca's area and the caudate head were co-opted in computing hierarchical structure (reorder - swap). Although familial sinistrality did not alter the activation pattern of Broca's area and the caudate head, it played a role in their activation asymmetry: both subject groups had left-lateralization in the inferior frontal gyrus, but they failed to show identical laterality in the BG. A possible explanation based on the direct and indirect pathways in the BG was offered and the laterality discrepancy was attributed to these two groups' different time course of language acquisition.To summarize, this study suggested that the BG, especially the head of the caudate nucleus, were involved in the abstract sequencing of language and that the distinct brain asymmetry associated with different familial sinistrality background might be rooted in the BG.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSequencingen_US
dc.subjectBasal gangliaen_US
dc.subjectLateralizationen_US
dc.subjectFamilial handednessen_US
dc.subjectLanguageen_US
dc.subjectImagingen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBever, Thomas G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBever, Thomas G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBever, Thomas G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarrett, Merrill F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2105en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747216en_US
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