Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195437
Title:
RISK FACTORS FOR PROSTATE CANCER PROGRESSION
Author:
Algotar, Amit Mohan
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Introduction: This dissertation seeks to identify novel, potentially modifiable risk factors that could be used to reduce the risk of prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Aim 1 investigates the effects of obesity and smoking on PCa progression, aim 2 studies the effects of specific medication use on PCa progression, and aim 3 identifies factors associated with faster PCa progression.Methods: Data from 140 subjects from the Watchful Waiting study followed every 3 months for up to 5 years were used. Multiple linear regressions were used to determine associations with baseline PSA. PSA velocity (rate of change of PSA over time) was used as a surrogate marker for PCa progression. Mixed effect models were used to assess the effect of obesity, smoking and medication use on PSA velocity(aim1 and 2). For aim 3, subjects were categorized as slow, intermediate and fast progressors based on tertiles of PSA velocity. In addition to the above variables, age, Gleason score, chromogranin-A, family history, selenium and free PSA were investigated as determinants of faster PCa progression using multiple logistic regressions. Analyses were run using two models, comparing slow progressors to fast progressors (model1) and slow progressors to a combination of fast and intermediate progressors (model2).Results: Aspirin use was negatively associated with baseline PSA (coefficient = -0.39 and 95% confidence interval (CI):-0.612, -0.158). Aspirin effect was statistically significant in never smokers (coefficient = -0.54, 95% CI: -0.916, -0.170) but not in ever smokers (coefficient = -0.22, 95% CI: -0.505, 0.065). Ever smoking was statistically significantly associated with higher PSA velocity compared to never smoking (coefficient = -0.001, 95% CI: 0.0002, 0.002). In aim 3, pack-years of smoking were positively associated whereas aspirin use was negatively associated with high PSA velocity in both models. Odds Ratio and 95% CI for smoking and aspirin use for model1 and 2 respectively; 1.03 (0.92, 1.13), 1.02 (1.00, 1.03), 0.24(0.06, 0.94) and 0.26(0.10, 0.68).Conclusions: Although more studies are needed before recommendations can be made, if these results are borne to be true in other studies these modifiable risk factors can be potentially be used in prevention of PCa progression.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Aspirin; Lifestyle factors; Medications; Progression; Prostate cancer
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Epidemiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ranger-Moore, James

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleRISK FACTORS FOR PROSTATE CANCER PROGRESSIONen_US
dc.creatorAlgotar, Amit Mohanen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlgotar, Amit Mohanen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: This dissertation seeks to identify novel, potentially modifiable risk factors that could be used to reduce the risk of prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Aim 1 investigates the effects of obesity and smoking on PCa progression, aim 2 studies the effects of specific medication use on PCa progression, and aim 3 identifies factors associated with faster PCa progression.Methods: Data from 140 subjects from the Watchful Waiting study followed every 3 months for up to 5 years were used. Multiple linear regressions were used to determine associations with baseline PSA. PSA velocity (rate of change of PSA over time) was used as a surrogate marker for PCa progression. Mixed effect models were used to assess the effect of obesity, smoking and medication use on PSA velocity(aim1 and 2). For aim 3, subjects were categorized as slow, intermediate and fast progressors based on tertiles of PSA velocity. In addition to the above variables, age, Gleason score, chromogranin-A, family history, selenium and free PSA were investigated as determinants of faster PCa progression using multiple logistic regressions. Analyses were run using two models, comparing slow progressors to fast progressors (model1) and slow progressors to a combination of fast and intermediate progressors (model2).Results: Aspirin use was negatively associated with baseline PSA (coefficient = -0.39 and 95% confidence interval (CI):-0.612, -0.158). Aspirin effect was statistically significant in never smokers (coefficient = -0.54, 95% CI: -0.916, -0.170) but not in ever smokers (coefficient = -0.22, 95% CI: -0.505, 0.065). Ever smoking was statistically significantly associated with higher PSA velocity compared to never smoking (coefficient = -0.001, 95% CI: 0.0002, 0.002). In aim 3, pack-years of smoking were positively associated whereas aspirin use was negatively associated with high PSA velocity in both models. Odds Ratio and 95% CI for smoking and aspirin use for model1 and 2 respectively; 1.03 (0.92, 1.13), 1.02 (1.00, 1.03), 0.24(0.06, 0.94) and 0.26(0.10, 0.68).Conclusions: Although more studies are needed before recommendations can be made, if these results are borne to be true in other studies these modifiable risk factors can be potentially be used in prevention of PCa progression.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAspirinen_US
dc.subjectLifestyle factorsen_US
dc.subjectMedicationsen_US
dc.subjectProgressionen_US
dc.subjectProstate canceren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRanger-Moore, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThompson, Patricia A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStratton, M. Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarris, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuerra, Stefanoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10136en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750690en_US
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