Kinetics and Mechanism of Ion Exchange Process and Resin Deactivation during Ultra-Purification of Water

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195416
Title:
Kinetics and Mechanism of Ion Exchange Process and Resin Deactivation during Ultra-Purification of Water
Author:
Castro Rodriguez, Mary Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The semiconductor industry currently requires large volumes of ultra pure water (UPW), a point of concern due to the potential effects on the environment. Although reduction of water consumption by the industry is challenging, it can be accomplished by implementation of different strategies such as the reuse and recycling of water, the development of more efficient wet cleans and wet processes, and the conversion to dry process. The lack of a systematic approach to determine the optimum combination of water recycling and reusing and the optimum type of process configuration for recycle treatment need to be addressed in order to achieve more efficient water conservation. Specifically, multi-component interactions in ion exchange processes and the effect of these interactions on the separation efficiency have been neglected when dealing with water reusing and recycling. Ion exchange resins initially containing different concentrations of impurities were utilized in experiments to determine the effect that organic and ionic contaminants initially contained in the ion exchange resin have on the adsorption of ionic compounds. Experiments were performed with the tested ion exchange resins to determine the effect of organic compounds in the liquid phase. A combination of experimental and modeling methods were utilized to determine the fundamental equilibrium and kinetic parameters for ion-ion and/or ion-organic interactions. The concentrations under investigation are relevant to the ion exchange application in industrial ultra-pure water plants with. Experiments showed that adsorption of ionic compounds were affected by the amount of organic and ionic contaminants initially contained in the ion exchange resin. Additionally, experiments showed that the adsorption of organic compounds affects the capacity of the ion exchange resin, thus changing the efficiency of the system. The effect of organic impurities is not only due to the degradation of the exchange media, but also due to specific chemical interactions. These chemical interactions may enhance the adsorption kinetics; however, even in the case of kinetic enhancement, the key inhibition effect appears to be due to ionic transport effects, which cause pore and/or site blockage. By incorporating an organic removal process, such as granular activated carbon (GAC) or UV-oxidation to the recycle purification sequence, greater efficiency of the overall separation system can be achieved, resulting in reduced water usage and waste generation.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shadman, Farhang
Committee Chair:
Shadman, Farhang

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleKinetics and Mechanism of Ion Exchange Process and Resin Deactivation during Ultra-Purification of Wateren_US
dc.creatorCastro Rodriguez, Mary Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorCastro Rodriguez, Mary Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe semiconductor industry currently requires large volumes of ultra pure water (UPW), a point of concern due to the potential effects on the environment. Although reduction of water consumption by the industry is challenging, it can be accomplished by implementation of different strategies such as the reuse and recycling of water, the development of more efficient wet cleans and wet processes, and the conversion to dry process. The lack of a systematic approach to determine the optimum combination of water recycling and reusing and the optimum type of process configuration for recycle treatment need to be addressed in order to achieve more efficient water conservation. Specifically, multi-component interactions in ion exchange processes and the effect of these interactions on the separation efficiency have been neglected when dealing with water reusing and recycling. Ion exchange resins initially containing different concentrations of impurities were utilized in experiments to determine the effect that organic and ionic contaminants initially contained in the ion exchange resin have on the adsorption of ionic compounds. Experiments were performed with the tested ion exchange resins to determine the effect of organic compounds in the liquid phase. A combination of experimental and modeling methods were utilized to determine the fundamental equilibrium and kinetic parameters for ion-ion and/or ion-organic interactions. The concentrations under investigation are relevant to the ion exchange application in industrial ultra-pure water plants with. Experiments showed that adsorption of ionic compounds were affected by the amount of organic and ionic contaminants initially contained in the ion exchange resin. Additionally, experiments showed that the adsorption of organic compounds affects the capacity of the ion exchange resin, thus changing the efficiency of the system. The effect of organic impurities is not only due to the degradation of the exchange media, but also due to specific chemical interactions. These chemical interactions may enhance the adsorption kinetics; however, even in the case of kinetic enhancement, the key inhibition effect appears to be due to ionic transport effects, which cause pore and/or site blockage. By incorporating an organic removal process, such as granular activated carbon (GAC) or UV-oxidation to the recycle purification sequence, greater efficiency of the overall separation system can be achieved, resulting in reduced water usage and waste generation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShadman, Farhangen_US
dc.contributor.chairShadman, Farhangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShadman, Farhangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBlowers, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSeraphin, Supapanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOgden, Kimberlyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1479en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356962en_US
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