Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195414
Title:
Survival of Enteric Bacteria and Viruses in Biosolids
Author:
Castro del Campo, Nohelia
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the developed world most of domestic sewage is treated by the activated sludge process, which results in large volumes of sludge or biosolids being produced. This results in millions of tons of biosolids produced each year in the United States, which must either be disposed of or recycled in some manner. Land application is seen as the most economical and beneficial way of handling biosolids. Although the United States Environmental Protection Agency supports and regulates the land application of biosolids, more research is needed to ensure its safe.The Appendix study A assessed the potential of Salmonella regrowth in Class A biosolids pellets and compost after land application. No Salmonella growth occurred in any of the soil/biosolids mixtures regardless of inoculum size or moisture content. While regrowth of Salmonella in biosolids may occur under saturated conditions it does not occur after Class A biosolid land application at typical agronomic rates. The Appendix B study evaluated the sensitivity of BGM and PLC/PRF/5 cell lines for detection of viruses as well as the occurrence and concentration of adenoviruses. The PLC/PRF/5 cell line was more sensitive for the detection of adenovirus and other enteroviruses in raw and Class B biosolids. The Appendix C study determined the potential of regrowth of Salmonella typhimurium in vermicompost and Class A biosolids alone and after addition to soil. In summary, no regrowth of Salmonella was observed, and the die-off of Salmonella was not different in soil, biosolids or vermicompost.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Soil, Water & Environmental Science
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gerba, Charles P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSurvival of Enteric Bacteria and Viruses in Biosolidsen_US
dc.creatorCastro del Campo, Noheliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCastro del Campo, Noheliaen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the developed world most of domestic sewage is treated by the activated sludge process, which results in large volumes of sludge or biosolids being produced. This results in millions of tons of biosolids produced each year in the United States, which must either be disposed of or recycled in some manner. Land application is seen as the most economical and beneficial way of handling biosolids. Although the United States Environmental Protection Agency supports and regulates the land application of biosolids, more research is needed to ensure its safe.The Appendix study A assessed the potential of Salmonella regrowth in Class A biosolids pellets and compost after land application. No Salmonella growth occurred in any of the soil/biosolids mixtures regardless of inoculum size or moisture content. While regrowth of Salmonella in biosolids may occur under saturated conditions it does not occur after Class A biosolid land application at typical agronomic rates. The Appendix B study evaluated the sensitivity of BGM and PLC/PRF/5 cell lines for detection of viruses as well as the occurrence and concentration of adenoviruses. The PLC/PRF/5 cell line was more sensitive for the detection of adenovirus and other enteroviruses in raw and Class B biosolids. The Appendix C study determined the potential of regrowth of Salmonella typhimurium in vermicompost and Class A biosolids alone and after addition to soil. In summary, no regrowth of Salmonella was observed, and the die-off of Salmonella was not different in soil, biosolids or vermicompost.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReynolds, Kelly A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSonger, J. Glennen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2249en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748087en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.