Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195401
Title:
Place, Performance, and Social Memory in the 1890s Ghost Dance
Author:
Carroll, Kristen Jean
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examines the role of place and ritual performance in the construction of subjectivities and social memories in relation to the 1890s Ghost Dance, a North American pan-Indian ritually-centered social movement that began in western Nevada and spread from the West Coast through the Great Plains during the last decade of the nineteenth century. This dissertation also explores efforts to alternatively preserve, promote, and eradicate practices representing two inherently contradictory spatial regimes, or ways of living as Beings-in-the-World. Such an analysis is done through the study of ritual and social responses to the spatial disruptions and collective identity ruptures evinced by Westward expansionism on the native peoples of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau called the Numa. This research is designed to advance knowledge of Ghost Dance ceremonial sites and ritual praxis in the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau. This is done through the isolation of physiographic characteristics, performance characteristics, and cultural inscription practices contributing to the selection, valuation, and use of particular ritual settings for Ghost Dance performances. I hypothesized that three types of sites, World Balancing Places, Regional Balancing Sites, and Local Balancing Sites, or Regions of Refuge, were used for ceremonialism associated with the Ghost Dance among Numic people. Type I sites are ceremonial sites that were used consistently before the arrival of Euroamericans and continued to be used during the late nineteenth century for the performance of the Ghost Dances. Both World and Local Balancing Places are Type 1 Sites. Type II sites are defined as places that were selected as ceremonial sites after encroachment activities made the performance characteristics of Type I Sites nonviable. The social unit of the present analysis is the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau. The current methodological framework has been formulated with the intent of producing a holistic treatment of Numic ritual landscapes as evidenced in Ghost Dance ceremonial sites. To this end, I have adopted an intersubjective and iterative approach that utilizes performance and narrative studies, behavioral archaeology, cultural landscape studies, and phenomenology. This research aims to contribute to the theory and methodology underscoring National Historic Preservation efforts.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
cultural landscapes; social memory; ghost dance; place; performance; subjectivity
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stoffle, Richard W.
Committee Chair:
Stoffle, Richard W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePlace, Performance, and Social Memory in the 1890s Ghost Danceen_US
dc.creatorCarroll, Kristen Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Kristen Jeanen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the role of place and ritual performance in the construction of subjectivities and social memories in relation to the 1890s Ghost Dance, a North American pan-Indian ritually-centered social movement that began in western Nevada and spread from the West Coast through the Great Plains during the last decade of the nineteenth century. This dissertation also explores efforts to alternatively preserve, promote, and eradicate practices representing two inherently contradictory spatial regimes, or ways of living as Beings-in-the-World. Such an analysis is done through the study of ritual and social responses to the spatial disruptions and collective identity ruptures evinced by Westward expansionism on the native peoples of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau called the Numa. This research is designed to advance knowledge of Ghost Dance ceremonial sites and ritual praxis in the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau. This is done through the isolation of physiographic characteristics, performance characteristics, and cultural inscription practices contributing to the selection, valuation, and use of particular ritual settings for Ghost Dance performances. I hypothesized that three types of sites, World Balancing Places, Regional Balancing Sites, and Local Balancing Sites, or Regions of Refuge, were used for ceremonialism associated with the Ghost Dance among Numic people. Type I sites are ceremonial sites that were used consistently before the arrival of Euroamericans and continued to be used during the late nineteenth century for the performance of the Ghost Dances. Both World and Local Balancing Places are Type 1 Sites. Type II sites are defined as places that were selected as ceremonial sites after encroachment activities made the performance characteristics of Type I Sites nonviable. The social unit of the present analysis is the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau. The current methodological framework has been formulated with the intent of producing a holistic treatment of Numic ritual landscapes as evidenced in Ghost Dance ceremonial sites. To this end, I have adopted an intersubjective and iterative approach that utilizes performance and narrative studies, behavioral archaeology, cultural landscape studies, and phenomenology. This research aims to contribute to the theory and methodology underscoring National Historic Preservation efforts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcultural landscapesen_US
dc.subjectsocial memoryen_US
dc.subjectghost danceen_US
dc.subjectplaceen_US
dc.subjectperformanceen_US
dc.subjectsubjectivityen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBabcock, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMendoza-Denton, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchiffer, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNieves Zedeno, Mariaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2154en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747300en_US
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