Language Maintenance in Aruba and Puerto Rico: Understanding Perceptions of Language Threat

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195400
Title:
Language Maintenance in Aruba and Puerto Rico: Understanding Perceptions of Language Threat
Author:
Carroll, Kevin Sean
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation uses qualitative research methods to describe the history of language use and maintenance on the islands of Aruba and Puerto Rico. More specifically, it examines how the islands' unique colonial circumstances have affected the maintenance of the local language. The multidisciplinary field of language planning and policy (LPP) has historically focused on documenting, categorizing and revitalizing languages that have undergone significant language shift. As a result, the majority of the discourse regarding threatened languages also implies that a threatened language will soon be endangered. The language contexts on the islands of Aruba and Puerto Rico do not conform to this often assumed linear progression. The use of document analysis, interviews with key players in LPP and observations on both islands provide the data for the position that there are unique contexts where language threat can be discussed, not in terms of language shift, but in terms of perceptions of threat. In addition to providing a detailed historical account of language situations on both islands, this dissertation frames the findings within a larger framework of redefining language threat. Special attention is paid to how social agents have influenced perceptions through the social amplification of risk framework. The work concludes with an argument for a framework that incorporates not only languages that have witnessed language shift, but also language contexts where languages are perceived to be threatened, with the understanding that such a distinction could potentially move the field of LPP toward a better understanding of language maintenance.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Aruban Papiamento; language maintenance; language threat; perception of threat; Puerto Rico; social amplification of threat
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ruiz, Richard
Committee Chair:
Ruiz, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLanguage Maintenance in Aruba and Puerto Rico: Understanding Perceptions of Language Threaten_US
dc.creatorCarroll, Kevin Seanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Kevin Seanen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation uses qualitative research methods to describe the history of language use and maintenance on the islands of Aruba and Puerto Rico. More specifically, it examines how the islands' unique colonial circumstances have affected the maintenance of the local language. The multidisciplinary field of language planning and policy (LPP) has historically focused on documenting, categorizing and revitalizing languages that have undergone significant language shift. As a result, the majority of the discourse regarding threatened languages also implies that a threatened language will soon be endangered. The language contexts on the islands of Aruba and Puerto Rico do not conform to this often assumed linear progression. The use of document analysis, interviews with key players in LPP and observations on both islands provide the data for the position that there are unique contexts where language threat can be discussed, not in terms of language shift, but in terms of perceptions of threat. In addition to providing a detailed historical account of language situations on both islands, this dissertation frames the findings within a larger framework of redefining language threat. Special attention is paid to how social agents have influenced perceptions through the social amplification of risk framework. The work concludes with an argument for a framework that incorporates not only languages that have witnessed language shift, but also language contexts where languages are perceived to be threatened, with the understanding that such a distinction could potentially move the field of LPP toward a better understanding of language maintenance.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAruban Papiamentoen_US
dc.subjectlanguage maintenanceen_US
dc.subjectlanguage threaten_US
dc.subjectperception of threaten_US
dc.subjectPuerto Ricoen_US
dc.subjectsocial amplification of threaten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.chairRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWyman, Leisy T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCombs, Mary Carolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTroike, Rudolph C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10430en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752063en_US
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