Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195398
Title:
Three Essays In Applied Microeconomics
Author:
Carrion-Flores, Carmen Eugenia
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation applies economic theories and econometric methods to analyze the interactions between government policies and economic agents in two important and current topics: the protection of the environment and illegal migration.Following the introduction, the second chapter studies the empirical strength of bi-directional linkages between environmental standards and performance, on the one hand, and environmental innovation, on the other. Our empirical results reveal that environmental R&D both spurs the tightening of government environmental standards and is spurred by the anticipation of such tightening, suggesting that U.S. environmental policy (at least in the context of the manufacturing industries that we study) has been responsive to innovation and effective in inducing innovation.The third chapter studies whether a voluntary reduction pollution programs can prompt firms to develop new environmental technologies that yield future emission reduction benefits. Conversely, a VRP may induce a participating firm to divert resources from environmental research to environmental monitoring and compliance activities that yield short-term benefits in reduced emissions. We find evidence that higher rates of program participation are associated with significant reductions in the number of successful environmental patent applications four to six years after the program ended.The fourth chapter examines the migration duration of Mexican immigrants in the U.S. using data from the Mexican Migration Project (MMP). In the past, temporary migrations were frequent, and often the rule rather than the exception in the case of Mexican immigrants. This pattern may be changing due to the tightening of the border between Mexico and the Unites States. Moreover, this paper examines whether migration experience, demographic characteristics, economic conditions or social networks drive the time Mexican immigrants to reside illegally in the United States. The empirical analysis shows that the migration duration increases as the U.S. expected real wage increases. Tighter U.S. migration policies have an ambiguous effect on the migration duration while longer distances decrease the hazard of return to their state of origin.In the final chapter of this dissertation, the general findings are concluded and some future avenues of research are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Environmental Innovation; Voluntary Pollution Reduction Programs; Illegal Migration; Border Enforcement; Dynamic and Count Data Models; Duration Models
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Economics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Innes, Robert; Oaxaca, Ronald L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThree Essays In Applied Microeconomicsen_US
dc.creatorCarrion-Flores, Carmen Eugeniaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarrion-Flores, Carmen Eugeniaen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation applies economic theories and econometric methods to analyze the interactions between government policies and economic agents in two important and current topics: the protection of the environment and illegal migration.Following the introduction, the second chapter studies the empirical strength of bi-directional linkages between environmental standards and performance, on the one hand, and environmental innovation, on the other. Our empirical results reveal that environmental R&D both spurs the tightening of government environmental standards and is spurred by the anticipation of such tightening, suggesting that U.S. environmental policy (at least in the context of the manufacturing industries that we study) has been responsive to innovation and effective in inducing innovation.The third chapter studies whether a voluntary reduction pollution programs can prompt firms to develop new environmental technologies that yield future emission reduction benefits. Conversely, a VRP may induce a participating firm to divert resources from environmental research to environmental monitoring and compliance activities that yield short-term benefits in reduced emissions. We find evidence that higher rates of program participation are associated with significant reductions in the number of successful environmental patent applications four to six years after the program ended.The fourth chapter examines the migration duration of Mexican immigrants in the U.S. using data from the Mexican Migration Project (MMP). In the past, temporary migrations were frequent, and often the rule rather than the exception in the case of Mexican immigrants. This pattern may be changing due to the tightening of the border between Mexico and the Unites States. Moreover, this paper examines whether migration experience, demographic characteristics, economic conditions or social networks drive the time Mexican immigrants to reside illegally in the United States. The empirical analysis shows that the migration duration increases as the U.S. expected real wage increases. Tighter U.S. migration policies have an ambiguous effect on the migration duration while longer distances decrease the hazard of return to their state of origin.In the final chapter of this dissertation, the general findings are concluded and some future avenues of research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Innovationen_US
dc.subjectVoluntary Pollution Reduction Programsen_US
dc.subjectIllegal Migrationen_US
dc.subjectBorder Enforcementen_US
dc.subjectDynamic and Count Data Modelsen_US
dc.subjectDuration Modelsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairInnes, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.chairOaxaca, Ronald L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInnes, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOaxaca, Ronald L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFishback, Price V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2141en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747249en_US
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