Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195368
Title:
Older Homeless Women with Depression
Author:
Cameron, Karen L.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This qualitative descriptive study described how seven older homeless women with depression characterized their homelessness, depression, and aging. The women, with a mean age of 54 years, were concerned with day-to-day survival, and contemplating aging while remaining homeless was frightening. The women described feeling depressed and most had received treatment for depression; however they did not describe their depression as hindering their ability to find housing. The themes were aging, homelessness, depression, and chronic health conditions. Homelessness contained the subthemes of addictions, loss of relationships, and lack of income. Depression contained the subthemes of history, experience, and treatment of depression. Although chronic health conditions and chronic pain were concerns for all participants, only one woman had access to ongoing health care. The majority of the women had no income. Nearly all the women had attended school beyond high school but this did not translate into better paying employment because most of them had worked at jobs with no benefits. Implications for policy development included expanding the safety net to provide housing options for homeless women in the 50-60 year range. Recommendations for practitioners included the suggestion that older homeless women be viewed as geriatric clients with care provided at that level. Future research should explore the connection between addictions and homelessness for older homeless women, the impact of chronic pain or chronic illness on their daily functioning, and the potential benefits of treating older homeless women according to standards of care developed for the geriatric general population.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
aging; geriatric; homeless; mental health; older; women
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Badger, Terry A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOlder Homeless Women with Depressionen_US
dc.creatorCameron, Karen L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Karen L.en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative descriptive study described how seven older homeless women with depression characterized their homelessness, depression, and aging. The women, with a mean age of 54 years, were concerned with day-to-day survival, and contemplating aging while remaining homeless was frightening. The women described feeling depressed and most had received treatment for depression; however they did not describe their depression as hindering their ability to find housing. The themes were aging, homelessness, depression, and chronic health conditions. Homelessness contained the subthemes of addictions, loss of relationships, and lack of income. Depression contained the subthemes of history, experience, and treatment of depression. Although chronic health conditions and chronic pain were concerns for all participants, only one woman had access to ongoing health care. The majority of the women had no income. Nearly all the women had attended school beyond high school but this did not translate into better paying employment because most of them had worked at jobs with no benefits. Implications for policy development included expanding the safety net to provide housing options for homeless women in the 50-60 year range. Recommendations for practitioners included the suggestion that older homeless women be viewed as geriatric clients with care provided at that level. Future research should explore the connection between addictions and homelessness for older homeless women, the impact of chronic pain or chronic illness on their daily functioning, and the potential benefits of treating older homeless women according to standards of care developed for the geriatric general population.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectagingen_US
dc.subjectgeriatricen_US
dc.subjecthomelessen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectolderen_US
dc.subjectwomenen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBadger, Terry A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janice D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11134en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752260992en_US
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