Between Women: Alliances and Divisions in American Indian, Mexican American, and Anglo American Literatures of Protest to Colonialism

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195349
Title:
Between Women: Alliances and Divisions in American Indian, Mexican American, and Anglo American Literatures of Protest to Colonialism
Author:
Burford, Arianne
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Between Women: Alliances and Divisions in American Indian, Mexican American, and Anglo American Literatures of Protest to Colonialism investigates nineteenth- and twentieth-century women writers' negotiation of women's rights discourses. This project examines the split between nineteenth-century women's rights groups and the Equal Rights Association to assess how American Indian, Mexican American, Anglo women, and, more recently, Chicana writers provide theoretical insights for new directions in feminisms. This study is grounded historically in order to learn from the past and continue efforts toward "decolonizing feminisms," to borrow a phrase from Chandra Mohanty. To that end, current feminist theories about alliances and solidarity are linked to ways that writers intervene in feminisms to simultaneously imagine solidarity against white male colonialist violence and object to racism on the part of Anglo women. Like all the writers in this study, Sarah Winnemucca's Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims (1883) challenges Anglo women to not be complicit with Anglo male colonialist violence. Winnemucca's testimony illuminates the history of alliances between Anglo and Native women and current debates amongst various Native women activists regarding feminism. Between Women traces how Anglo American writer Helen Hunt Jackson's Ramona (1884) protests effects of U.S. colonialism on Luiseno people and her negotiation of feminisms compared with Winnemucca's writing and Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton's The Squatter and the Don (1885) and Who Would Have Thought It? (1872), novels that protest the effects of U.S. colonialism on Mexican Americans, particularly women. It then compares Ruiz de Burton's writing to Helena Mari­a Viramontes's Under the Feet of Jesus (1995) and Cherri­e Moraga's Heroes and Saints (1994), texts that acknowledge the difficulties of forming alliances between women in the context of exploitation, pesticide poisoning of Chicanas/os, and border policies. The epilogue points to Evelina Lucero's Night Sky, Morning Star (2000), demonstrating how an understanding of the history that Winnemucca engages elucidates American Indian literature in the twenty-first century. By looking deeply at how nineteenth-century conflicts effect us in the present, scholars and activists might better assess tactics for feminisms in the twenty-first century that enact an anti-colonialist feminist praxis.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Chicana; feminisms; American Indian; Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton; Helen Hunt Jackson; Helena Maria Viramontes
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cooper-Alarcon, Daniel
Committee Chair:
Cooper-Alarcon, Daniel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBetween Women: Alliances and Divisions in American Indian, Mexican American, and Anglo American Literatures of Protest to Colonialismen_US
dc.creatorBurford, Arianneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurford, Arianneen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBetween Women: Alliances and Divisions in American Indian, Mexican American, and Anglo American Literatures of Protest to Colonialism investigates nineteenth- and twentieth-century women writers' negotiation of women's rights discourses. This project examines the split between nineteenth-century women's rights groups and the Equal Rights Association to assess how American Indian, Mexican American, Anglo women, and, more recently, Chicana writers provide theoretical insights for new directions in feminisms. This study is grounded historically in order to learn from the past and continue efforts toward "decolonizing feminisms," to borrow a phrase from Chandra Mohanty. To that end, current feminist theories about alliances and solidarity are linked to ways that writers intervene in feminisms to simultaneously imagine solidarity against white male colonialist violence and object to racism on the part of Anglo women. Like all the writers in this study, Sarah Winnemucca's Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims (1883) challenges Anglo women to not be complicit with Anglo male colonialist violence. Winnemucca's testimony illuminates the history of alliances between Anglo and Native women and current debates amongst various Native women activists regarding feminism. Between Women traces how Anglo American writer Helen Hunt Jackson's Ramona (1884) protests effects of U.S. colonialism on Luiseno people and her negotiation of feminisms compared with Winnemucca's writing and Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton's The Squatter and the Don (1885) and Who Would Have Thought It? (1872), novels that protest the effects of U.S. colonialism on Mexican Americans, particularly women. It then compares Ruiz de Burton's writing to Helena Mari­a Viramontes's Under the Feet of Jesus (1995) and Cherri­e Moraga's Heroes and Saints (1994), texts that acknowledge the difficulties of forming alliances between women in the context of exploitation, pesticide poisoning of Chicanas/os, and border policies. The epilogue points to Evelina Lucero's Night Sky, Morning Star (2000), demonstrating how an understanding of the history that Winnemucca engages elucidates American Indian literature in the twenty-first century. By looking deeply at how nineteenth-century conflicts effect us in the present, scholars and activists might better assess tactics for feminisms in the twenty-first century that enact an anti-colonialist feminist praxis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectChicanaen_US
dc.subjectfeminismsen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen_US
dc.subjectMaria Amparo Ruiz de Burtonen_US
dc.subjectHelen Hunt Jacksonen_US
dc.subjectHelena Maria Viramontesen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCooper-Alarcon, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.chairCooper-Alarcon, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTemple, Judy Nolteen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTapahonso, Lucien_US
dc.identifier.proquest2306en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748159en_US
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