Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195340
Title:
Leadership Practices that Support Collegiality in Schools
Author:
Brunderman, Lynnette Ann
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research has identified collegiality, encouraged by the school leader, as one of the factors present in highly effective schools. However, there is not a widely accepted understanding of what collegiality is or how it is fostered. This study examined teachers' perceptions about collegiality and leadership practices that supported its development in schools. This investigation of the collegial experiences and understandings of teachers in three elementary school settings was conducted primarily through interviews and observation. A high level of collegiality existed among the staff at the three schools, and staff perceptions of the factors that impacted those collegial experiences yielded important data. Three basic questions guided this research: (1) How do teachers demonstrate their own collegial behaviors in schools?; (2) What conditions do teachers identify that enhance teacher collegiality?; and (3) What are the leadership behaviors that foster and support collegiality? A summary of the findings suggested that teachers talking about practice and teachers teaching one another were the two most often discussed and practiced indicators of collegiality. The findings of this study strengthen the connection between well-established transformational leadership practices and teacher collegiality. Both aspiring and practicing leaders need to understand the theory and research behind the practice of transformational leadership and its link to collegiality in schools.This study has added to the body of research, supporting the link between leadership behavior of principals and the collegiality of teachers. Transformational leadership practices contribute to school effectiveness and continuing teacher growth and development. This has implications for the day-to-day practice of leaders, for the professional development of teachers, and for leadership development. A deep understanding of collegiality and the leadership practices that support and sustain it is necessary in an era of continuous school improvement.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
collegiality; leadership practices; teacher collaboration
Degree Name:
EdD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Leadership; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Hendricks, J. Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLeadership Practices that Support Collegiality in Schoolsen_US
dc.creatorBrunderman, Lynnette Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrunderman, Lynnette Annen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch has identified collegiality, encouraged by the school leader, as one of the factors present in highly effective schools. However, there is not a widely accepted understanding of what collegiality is or how it is fostered. This study examined teachers' perceptions about collegiality and leadership practices that supported its development in schools. This investigation of the collegial experiences and understandings of teachers in three elementary school settings was conducted primarily through interviews and observation. A high level of collegiality existed among the staff at the three schools, and staff perceptions of the factors that impacted those collegial experiences yielded important data. Three basic questions guided this research: (1) How do teachers demonstrate their own collegial behaviors in schools?; (2) What conditions do teachers identify that enhance teacher collegiality?; and (3) What are the leadership behaviors that foster and support collegiality? A summary of the findings suggested that teachers talking about practice and teachers teaching one another were the two most often discussed and practiced indicators of collegiality. The findings of this study strengthen the connection between well-established transformational leadership practices and teacher collegiality. Both aspiring and practicing leaders need to understand the theory and research behind the practice of transformational leadership and its link to collegiality in schools.This study has added to the body of research, supporting the link between leadership behavior of principals and the collegiality of teachers. Transformational leadership practices contribute to school effectiveness and continuing teacher growth and development. This has implications for the day-to-day practice of leaders, for the professional development of teachers, and for leadership development. A deep understanding of collegiality and the leadership practices that support and sustain it is necessary in an era of continuous school improvement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcollegialityen_US
dc.subjectleadership practicesen_US
dc.subjectteacher collaborationen_US
thesis.degree.nameEdDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPedicone, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBosworth, Krisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1886en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746446en_US
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