Learning to Stand on Shifting Sands: Sonoran Desert Capitalism, Alliance Politics, and Social Change

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195325
Title:
Learning to Stand on Shifting Sands: Sonoran Desert Capitalism, Alliance Politics, and Social Change
Author:
Zimmerman, Caren Amelia
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Learning to Stand on Shifting Sands: Sonoran Desert Capitalism, Alliance Politics, and Social Change offers a comparative analysis of activisms, labor organizing, and production practices in southern Arizona between 1999 and 2003. Using a combination of political economy, queer/feminist theory, transdisciplinary critical cultural studies, and discourse analysis, the research analyzes the broad social and ideological contexts, the tactics, the contradictions and the attempts and lost opportunities for building broader alliances for radical social change in contemporary Arizona. The case studies reckon with this experience, arguing that: Arizona's migrant workers have been strategically produced via media practices, border militarization, "development" discourse, and global production practices as flexible post-NAFTA commodities that enable formidable nationalist and heteronormative representation and political economic practices within the Sonoran desert border region. That local activism and labor organizing draws upon neoliberal "development" discourse strategies, and also breaks from these strategies in ways that suggests that the terms of production and exchange might be usefully applied towards outcomes that are outside of profit accumulation. That alliance practices that take structures and discourses of domination into account in estimations of value, even in production, can promote broader collaborations between activist organizations, cultural identities and single-issue politics. A politics of alliance that accounts for the interdependence of seemingly disparate practices of production, social oppression and culture might help invigorate contemporary grass roots struggles and promote social transformation.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Social Change; Social Movement; U.S.-Mexico border; Arizona; Alliance Politics
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Comparative Cultural & Literary Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Joseph, Miranda
Committee Chair:
Joseph, Miranda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLearning to Stand on Shifting Sands: Sonoran Desert Capitalism, Alliance Politics, and Social Changeen_US
dc.creatorZimmerman, Caren Ameliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, Caren Ameliaen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLearning to Stand on Shifting Sands: Sonoran Desert Capitalism, Alliance Politics, and Social Change offers a comparative analysis of activisms, labor organizing, and production practices in southern Arizona between 1999 and 2003. Using a combination of political economy, queer/feminist theory, transdisciplinary critical cultural studies, and discourse analysis, the research analyzes the broad social and ideological contexts, the tactics, the contradictions and the attempts and lost opportunities for building broader alliances for radical social change in contemporary Arizona. The case studies reckon with this experience, arguing that: Arizona's migrant workers have been strategically produced via media practices, border militarization, "development" discourse, and global production practices as flexible post-NAFTA commodities that enable formidable nationalist and heteronormative representation and political economic practices within the Sonoran desert border region. That local activism and labor organizing draws upon neoliberal "development" discourse strategies, and also breaks from these strategies in ways that suggests that the terms of production and exchange might be usefully applied towards outcomes that are outside of profit accumulation. That alliance practices that take structures and discourses of domination into account in estimations of value, even in production, can promote broader collaborations between activist organizations, cultural identities and single-issue politics. A politics of alliance that accounts for the interdependence of seemingly disparate practices of production, social oppression and culture might help invigorate contemporary grass roots struggles and promote social transformation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSocial Changeen_US
dc.subjectSocial Movementen_US
dc.subjectU.S.-Mexico borderen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectAlliance Politicsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural & Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJoseph, Mirandaen_US
dc.contributor.chairJoseph, Mirandaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHennessy, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing, Samanthaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWaterstone, Marvinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1969en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746545en_US
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