ERROR ANALYSIS AND DATA REDUCTION FOR INTERFEROMETRIC SURFACE MEASUREMENTS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195309
Title:
ERROR ANALYSIS AND DATA REDUCTION FOR INTERFEROMETRIC SURFACE MEASUREMENTS
Author:
Zhou, Ping
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
High-precision optical systems are generally tested using interferometry, since it often is the only way to achieve the desired measurement precision and accuracy. Interferometers can generally measure a surface to an accuracy of one hundredth of a wave. In order to achieve an accuracy to the next order of magnitude, one thousandth of a wave, each error source in the measurement must be characterized and calibrated.Errors in interferometric measurements are classified into random errors and systematic errors. An approach to estimate random errors in the measurement is provided, based on the variation in the data. Systematic errors, such as retrace error, imaging distortion, and error due to diffraction effects, are also studied in this dissertation. Methods to estimate the first order geometric error and errors due to diffraction effects are presented.Interferometer phase modulation transfer function (MTF) is another intrinsic error. The phase MTF of an infrared interferometer is measured with a phase Siemens star, and a Wiener filter is designed to recover the middle spatial frequency information.Map registration is required when there are two maps tested in different systems and one of these two maps needs to be subtracted from the other. Incorrect mapping causes wavefront errors. A smoothing filter method is presented which can reduce the sensitivity to registration error and improve the overall measurement accuracy.Interferometric optical testing with computer-generated holograms (CGH) is widely used for measuring aspheric surfaces. The accuracy of the drawn pattern on a hologram decides the accuracy of the measurement. Uncertainties in the CGH manufacturing process introduce errors in holograms and then the generated wavefront. An optimal design of the CGH is provided which can reduce the sensitivity to fabrication errors and give good diffraction efficiency for both chrome-on-glass and phase etched CGHs.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Computer-generated hologram; Diffraction effect; Interferometer calibration; Interferometric measurement; Interferomter MTF; Map registration
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burge, James H
Committee Chair:
Burge, James H

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleERROR ANALYSIS AND DATA REDUCTION FOR INTERFEROMETRIC SURFACE MEASUREMENTSen_US
dc.creatorZhou, Pingen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Pingen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHigh-precision optical systems are generally tested using interferometry, since it often is the only way to achieve the desired measurement precision and accuracy. Interferometers can generally measure a surface to an accuracy of one hundredth of a wave. In order to achieve an accuracy to the next order of magnitude, one thousandth of a wave, each error source in the measurement must be characterized and calibrated.Errors in interferometric measurements are classified into random errors and systematic errors. An approach to estimate random errors in the measurement is provided, based on the variation in the data. Systematic errors, such as retrace error, imaging distortion, and error due to diffraction effects, are also studied in this dissertation. Methods to estimate the first order geometric error and errors due to diffraction effects are presented.Interferometer phase modulation transfer function (MTF) is another intrinsic error. The phase MTF of an infrared interferometer is measured with a phase Siemens star, and a Wiener filter is designed to recover the middle spatial frequency information.Map registration is required when there are two maps tested in different systems and one of these two maps needs to be subtracted from the other. Incorrect mapping causes wavefront errors. A smoothing filter method is presented which can reduce the sensitivity to registration error and improve the overall measurement accuracy.Interferometric optical testing with computer-generated holograms (CGH) is widely used for measuring aspheric surfaces. The accuracy of the drawn pattern on a hologram decides the accuracy of the measurement. Uncertainties in the CGH manufacturing process introduce errors in holograms and then the generated wavefront. An optimal design of the CGH is provided which can reduce the sensitivity to fabrication errors and give good diffraction efficiency for both chrome-on-glass and phase etched CGHs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectComputer-generated hologramen_US
dc.subjectDiffraction effecten_US
dc.subjectInterferometer calibrationen_US
dc.subjectInterferometric measurementen_US
dc.subjectInterferomter MTFen_US
dc.subjectMap registrationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurge, James Hen_US
dc.contributor.chairBurge, James Hen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, Hubert Men_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWyant, James Cen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10784en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753628en_US
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