One Foot In: Student-Athlete Advocacy and Social Movement Rhetoric in the Margins of American College Athletics

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195290
Title:
One Foot In: Student-Athlete Advocacy and Social Movement Rhetoric in the Margins of American College Athletics
Author:
Broussard, William James
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In "One Foot In: Student-Athlete Advocacy and Social Movement Rhetoric in the Margins of American College Athletics," the author explores student-athlete advocacy of black male student-athletes in revenue generating sports and educational and cultural reforms to NCAA policies and bylaws over approximately two decades (1985-2006). The author examines non-profit organizations--Black Coaches Association, Drake Group, Institute for Diversity and Ethics and Sport, and Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics--who pressured the NCAA to enact measures to restore order and balance to American college athletics. In addition, these measures are designed to increase student-athlete graduation rates, increase opportunities for minority coaches and administrators, and protect college educators who blow the whistle on institutions who commit infractions. The author begins by identifying social movement rhetorical strategies--the "Triple Front" strategy of Harold Cruse and Agitation/Control Rhetoric of Bowers, Ochs, and Jensen--to analyze rhetorical interactions between non-profit organizations and the NCAA, especially how the NCAA responds by using control rhetoric in order to protect itself from outside influences. Finally, the author ends the discussion by using autoethnography to analyze my own experiences as a writing program administrator challenging NCAA hegemony by running a progressive writing program within a traditional student-athlete study hall.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
College Athletics; NCAA; Higher Education; Social Movement Rhetoric; Non-Profit-Organizations; Writing Program Administration
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Mountford, Roxanne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOne Foot In: Student-Athlete Advocacy and Social Movement Rhetoric in the Margins of American College Athleticsen_US
dc.creatorBroussard, William Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorBroussard, William Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn "One Foot In: Student-Athlete Advocacy and Social Movement Rhetoric in the Margins of American College Athletics," the author explores student-athlete advocacy of black male student-athletes in revenue generating sports and educational and cultural reforms to NCAA policies and bylaws over approximately two decades (1985-2006). The author examines non-profit organizations--Black Coaches Association, Drake Group, Institute for Diversity and Ethics and Sport, and Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics--who pressured the NCAA to enact measures to restore order and balance to American college athletics. In addition, these measures are designed to increase student-athlete graduation rates, increase opportunities for minority coaches and administrators, and protect college educators who blow the whistle on institutions who commit infractions. The author begins by identifying social movement rhetorical strategies--the "Triple Front" strategy of Harold Cruse and Agitation/Control Rhetoric of Bowers, Ochs, and Jensen--to analyze rhetorical interactions between non-profit organizations and the NCAA, especially how the NCAA responds by using control rhetoric in order to protect itself from outside influences. Finally, the author ends the discussion by using autoethnography to analyze my own experiences as a writing program administrator challenging NCAA hegemony by running a progressive writing program within a traditional student-athlete study hall.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCollege Athleticsen_US
dc.subjectNCAAen_US
dc.subjectHigher Educationen_US
dc.subjectSocial Movement Rhetoricen_US
dc.subjectNon-Profit-Organizationsen_US
dc.subjectWriting Program Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMountford, Roxanneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHall, Anne-Marieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeSeur-Brown, Getaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHawhee, Debraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2111en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747220en_US
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