Peptide Fragmentation and Amino Acid Quantification by Mass Spectrometry

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195288
Title:
Peptide Fragmentation and Amino Acid Quantification by Mass Spectrometry
Author:
Zhang, Qingfen
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research presented in this dissertation falls into two parts: fragmentation mechanisms of peptide and fragmentation mechanism of amino acid derivatives. The study of peptide fragmentation may help to improve protein identification by incorporating the rules governing this process into search algorithms. This study elucidates the chemical 'rules' governing peptide dissociation. It is believed that these 'rules' can be incorporated into searching algorithms to achieve better protein identification. The present study focuses on the effects of different amino acids on fragmentation. Amino acids with a wide range of different chemical and physical properties are investigated, including amino acids with hydrophilic side chains, amino acids with aliphatic side chains and amino acids without side chains. It can be concluded from the present studies that the different amino acid properties have great influence on the peptide fragmentation and spectrum appearance.The study of fragmentation mechanisms of amino acid derivatives is another focus of this dissertation. Based on the fragmentation mechanism study, a quantification method was developed. The method can distinguish glutamine with 15N-label at N-terminal amine vs the side chain even if they have same molecular weight. Ammonia metabolism was successfully monitored by feeding mosquitoes with isotope-labeled compounds and subsequently measuring the amount of the labeled amino acids. This method demonstrates the power of mass spectrometry in metabolism studies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
mass spectrometry; amino acid; peptide; collision-induced dissociation; protein identification; ammonia metabolism
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wysocki, Vicki H.
Committee Chair:
Wysocki, Vicki H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePeptide Fragmentation and Amino Acid Quantification by Mass Spectrometryen_US
dc.creatorZhang, Qingfenen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Qingfenen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch presented in this dissertation falls into two parts: fragmentation mechanisms of peptide and fragmentation mechanism of amino acid derivatives. The study of peptide fragmentation may help to improve protein identification by incorporating the rules governing this process into search algorithms. This study elucidates the chemical 'rules' governing peptide dissociation. It is believed that these 'rules' can be incorporated into searching algorithms to achieve better protein identification. The present study focuses on the effects of different amino acids on fragmentation. Amino acids with a wide range of different chemical and physical properties are investigated, including amino acids with hydrophilic side chains, amino acids with aliphatic side chains and amino acids without side chains. It can be concluded from the present studies that the different amino acid properties have great influence on the peptide fragmentation and spectrum appearance.The study of fragmentation mechanisms of amino acid derivatives is another focus of this dissertation. Based on the fragmentation mechanism study, a quantification method was developed. The method can distinguish glutamine with 15N-label at N-terminal amine vs the side chain even if they have same molecular weight. Ammonia metabolism was successfully monitored by feeding mosquitoes with isotope-labeled compounds and subsequently measuring the amount of the labeled amino acids. This method demonstrates the power of mass spectrometry in metabolism studies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmass spectrometryen_US
dc.subjectamino aciden_US
dc.subjectpeptideen_US
dc.subjectcollision-induced dissociationen_US
dc.subjectprotein identificationen_US
dc.subjectammonia metabolismen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWysocki, Vicki H.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWysocki, Vicki H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArmstrong, Neal R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAspinwall, Craig A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGhosh, Indraneelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWells, Michael A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1596en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356058en_US
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