Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195274
Title:
Halophytes for Bioremediation of Salt Affected Lands
Author:
Zerai, Desale Berhe
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The area of secondarily salinized lands is increasing at a faster rate over time. Many irrigation districts around the world are shrinking as a result of secondarily salinized soils. This is resulting in crop yield losses. Irrigation practices with low drainage are intensifying this problem. Bioremediation of salinized soils with halophytes is one of the means of reversing this process. In these studies, we tested the growth and performance of four salt tolerant halophytes to varying levels of salinity. We analyzed the salt content of the plant tissues at different salinities, in order to determine how the plants' tissues reflect the increases in salinity. It was discovered that Allenrolfea occidentalis tolerates and grows well at higher salinities than the other plants tested. Furthermore, the concentration of salt in the aerial plant tissue was high and increased further in response to the external salt concentration. Halophytes such as A. occidentalis can be used to remediate abandoned salt affected lands and their biomass can have an added economic value. On the other hand, domestication of wild halophytes for agronomic purposes represents another opportunity to address the increasingly salinized soils and shortages of freshwater around the world. In these studies, we assessed the potential for improvement of an oilseed halophyte, Salicornia bigelovii, through selective breeding. We compared plant characteristics of S. bigelovii cultivars produced in breeding programs with wild germplasm in a green house common garden experiment. We concluded that S. bigelovii has sufficient genetic diversity among wild accessions and cultivars to support a crop improvement program to introduce desirable agronomic characteristics into this wild halophyte.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Salinity; Bioremediation; Halophytes; Salt; Allenrolfea occidentalis; Salicornia bigelovii
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Glenn, Edward P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleHalophytes for Bioremediation of Salt Affected Landsen_US
dc.creatorZerai, Desale Berheen_US
dc.contributor.authorZerai, Desale Berheen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe area of secondarily salinized lands is increasing at a faster rate over time. Many irrigation districts around the world are shrinking as a result of secondarily salinized soils. This is resulting in crop yield losses. Irrigation practices with low drainage are intensifying this problem. Bioremediation of salinized soils with halophytes is one of the means of reversing this process. In these studies, we tested the growth and performance of four salt tolerant halophytes to varying levels of salinity. We analyzed the salt content of the plant tissues at different salinities, in order to determine how the plants' tissues reflect the increases in salinity. It was discovered that Allenrolfea occidentalis tolerates and grows well at higher salinities than the other plants tested. Furthermore, the concentration of salt in the aerial plant tissue was high and increased further in response to the external salt concentration. Halophytes such as A. occidentalis can be used to remediate abandoned salt affected lands and their biomass can have an added economic value. On the other hand, domestication of wild halophytes for agronomic purposes represents another opportunity to address the increasingly salinized soils and shortages of freshwater around the world. In these studies, we assessed the potential for improvement of an oilseed halophyte, Salicornia bigelovii, through selective breeding. We compared plant characteristics of S. bigelovii cultivars produced in breeding programs with wild germplasm in a green house common garden experiment. We concluded that S. bigelovii has sufficient genetic diversity among wild accessions and cultivars to support a crop improvement program to introduce desirable agronomic characteristics into this wild halophyte.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSalinityen_US
dc.subjectBioremediationen_US
dc.subjectHalophytesen_US
dc.subjectSalten_US
dc.subjectAllenrolfea occidentalisen_US
dc.subjectSalicornia bigeloviien_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGlenn, Edward P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFitzsimmons, Kevin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Stephen G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCollier, Robert J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2408en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748310en_US
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