The Role of Japanese Particles for L1 and L2 Oral Reading: What Miscues and Eye Movements Reveal about Comprehension of Written Text

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195229
Title:
The Role of Japanese Particles for L1 and L2 Oral Reading: What Miscues and Eye Movements Reveal about Comprehension of Written Text
Author:
Yamashita, Yoshitomo
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Japanese particles have been studied syntactically and semantically in connection with preceding words for constructing sentence, and studied in terms of predicate in connection with core meaning of the noun. However, the role of particles in the field of reading has not clearly been explained. This dissertation investigates the role of Japanese particles for L2 and L1 readers reading aloud through the following questions: (1) In what ways do L 2 and L1 Japanese readers miscue on particles? (2) Why do L2 and L1 Japanese readers elongate the phoneme of the particle? (3) How do L2 and L1 Japanese readers' eye movements show fixation points on particles? (4) How do L2 and L1's Japanese readers' miscues of particles relate to the L2 and L1 readers' eye movements? (5) How do L2 and L1 readers' fixation points on particles relate to elongation? (6) How do L2 and L1 Japanese readers' fixation points relate to miscues and elongation? Five L2 and four L1 readers read a Japanese story that included 121 particles. By looking at miscues, the results show the segmentation process using particles. This segmentation process minimizes the number of particle miscues. Substitution, omission, and insertion miscues occur in a complex manner because they are related to finding word boundaries. Elongation occurs as a process of prediction and confirmation for making sense. L2 readers use elongation with miscues more often than L1 readers. In eye movement research, L2 reader's miscues are more highly connected to eye fixation than are L1 readers' miscues. Eye fixation points and elongation are used for prediction and confirmation for making sense. However, L1 readers' miscues mainly consist of fixation without elongation. L2 readers use more particles while L1 readers use more flexible construction with the meaning of adjacent words playing an important role. Readers do not just fixate, but also elongate particles to get information. The result shows that readers use miscues on particles, elongation, and eye fixations as complex processes to construct a meaningful text.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Eye movement; Miscue Analysis: Japanese Particles
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Goodman, Yetta; Ruiz, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Japanese Particles for L1 and L2 Oral Reading: What Miscues and Eye Movements Reveal about Comprehension of Written Texten_US
dc.creatorYamashita, Yoshitomoen_US
dc.contributor.authorYamashita, Yoshitomoen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractJapanese particles have been studied syntactically and semantically in connection with preceding words for constructing sentence, and studied in terms of predicate in connection with core meaning of the noun. However, the role of particles in the field of reading has not clearly been explained. This dissertation investigates the role of Japanese particles for L2 and L1 readers reading aloud through the following questions: (1) In what ways do L 2 and L1 Japanese readers miscue on particles? (2) Why do L2 and L1 Japanese readers elongate the phoneme of the particle? (3) How do L2 and L1 Japanese readers' eye movements show fixation points on particles? (4) How do L2 and L1's Japanese readers' miscues of particles relate to the L2 and L1 readers' eye movements? (5) How do L2 and L1 readers' fixation points on particles relate to elongation? (6) How do L2 and L1 Japanese readers' fixation points relate to miscues and elongation? Five L2 and four L1 readers read a Japanese story that included 121 particles. By looking at miscues, the results show the segmentation process using particles. This segmentation process minimizes the number of particle miscues. Substitution, omission, and insertion miscues occur in a complex manner because they are related to finding word boundaries. Elongation occurs as a process of prediction and confirmation for making sense. L2 readers use elongation with miscues more often than L1 readers. In eye movement research, L2 reader's miscues are more highly connected to eye fixation than are L1 readers' miscues. Eye fixation points and elongation are used for prediction and confirmation for making sense. However, L1 readers' miscues mainly consist of fixation without elongation. L2 readers use more particles while L1 readers use more flexible construction with the meaning of adjacent words playing an important role. Readers do not just fixate, but also elongate particles to get information. The result shows that readers use miscues on particles, elongation, and eye fixations as complex processes to construct a meaningful text.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEye movementen_US
dc.subjectMiscue Analysis: Japanese Particlesen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGoodman, Yettaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVance, Timothy J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaker, C. Juneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2545en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748475en_US
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