Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195189
Title:
Affect, Politics, Ontology
Author:
Woodward, Keith Adam
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The relationship between politics and ontology has long been a troubled one for geography. More recently, the emergence of affect theory has complicated things even further by introducing a new set of frequently vague concepts into the already cluttered theoretical field of critical geography. This dissertation collects six articles that endeavor to develop the groundwork for establishing a continuum between affect, politics, and ontology. Specifically, it argues that not only is affect a politically rich area for approaching ontology, but, further, it is particularly well suited for addressing difference and radical politics. It proceeds by developing a series of concepts that animate a politically driven ontology of difference, namely: A) becoming and bordering in the context of border studies; B) a flat ontology as a fix for the debilitating transcendence of scale theory; C) an animation of a Nollywood as a 'site' based upon the flat ontological critique of scale; D) a politics of confusion that isolates the workings of affect in relation to the State and in direct action; E) a psycho-pragmatism that checks studies of affect and nonrepresentational theory against the analytic determinism that attends their developing methodologies; and F) the notions of fidelity and affinity as they get articulated through to the State and political subjectivity.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Affect and Emotion; Minor Politics; Flat Ontology; Direct Action; Site; New York Republican National Convention 2004
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jones III, John P
Committee Chair:
Jones III, John P

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAffect, Politics, Ontologyen_US
dc.creatorWoodward, Keith Adamen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Keith Adamen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between politics and ontology has long been a troubled one for geography. More recently, the emergence of affect theory has complicated things even further by introducing a new set of frequently vague concepts into the already cluttered theoretical field of critical geography. This dissertation collects six articles that endeavor to develop the groundwork for establishing a continuum between affect, politics, and ontology. Specifically, it argues that not only is affect a politically rich area for approaching ontology, but, further, it is particularly well suited for addressing difference and radical politics. It proceeds by developing a series of concepts that animate a politically driven ontology of difference, namely: A) becoming and bordering in the context of border studies; B) a flat ontology as a fix for the debilitating transcendence of scale theory; C) an animation of a Nollywood as a 'site' based upon the flat ontological critique of scale; D) a politics of confusion that isolates the workings of affect in relation to the State and in direct action; E) a psycho-pragmatism that checks studies of affect and nonrepresentational theory against the analytic determinism that attends their developing methodologies; and F) the notions of fidelity and affinity as they get articulated through to the State and political subjectivity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAffect and Emotionen_US
dc.subjectMinor Politicsen_US
dc.subjectFlat Ontologyen_US
dc.subjectDirect Actionen_US
dc.subjectSiteen_US
dc.subjectNew York Republican National Convention 2004en_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJones III, John Pen_US
dc.contributor.chairJones III, John Pen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarston, Sallie A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSecor, Anna J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJoseph, Mirandaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2136en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747246en_US
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