Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195177
Title:
The Myth Appeal: Studies in Cultural Narrative
Author:
Winslow, Andrew J.
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Though Aristotle is famous for defining three persuasive appeals in his treatise On Rhetoric, I argue that a fourth appeal exists in the pages of The Poetics. In addition to character (ethos), logic (logos), and emotion (pathos), the fourth appeal is to narrative (mythos), or the substantive body of values contained within the socio-cultural elements of a given culture. Using the works of Joseph Campbell, Kenneth Burke, and Roland Barthes as touchstones, the goal of this dissertation is to offer a systematic analysis of this appeal. Because human beings at once function with attention to the whole of lived experience, the myth appeal touches on social norms (the assumed reality), ideology (the lived and presumed reality), and hyperreality (where symbols become a reality unto themselves). The substance of the myth appeal is narrative, or undercurrents of stories used in the place of argument. Here, I offer four examples to display these tensions; the first is an "action-figure" toy line to illustrate how an existing mythology from comics conveys ideological values; the second is a post 09/11 comic book series which used hyperreality to critique social norms; the third is Alan Sokal's academic hoax , which showed a cultural tension across all three areas; and finally, a survey of U.S. Supreme Court decisions on privacy to discuss the emerging mythology of abortion. I conclude with a systematic approach to myth, and a brief discussion of additional persuasive appeals.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Culture; Language; Myth; Narrative; Rhetoric; Semiotics
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enos, Theresa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Myth Appeal: Studies in Cultural Narrativeen_US
dc.creatorWinslow, Andrew J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWinslow, Andrew J.en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThough Aristotle is famous for defining three persuasive appeals in his treatise On Rhetoric, I argue that a fourth appeal exists in the pages of The Poetics. In addition to character (ethos), logic (logos), and emotion (pathos), the fourth appeal is to narrative (mythos), or the substantive body of values contained within the socio-cultural elements of a given culture. Using the works of Joseph Campbell, Kenneth Burke, and Roland Barthes as touchstones, the goal of this dissertation is to offer a systematic analysis of this appeal. Because human beings at once function with attention to the whole of lived experience, the myth appeal touches on social norms (the assumed reality), ideology (the lived and presumed reality), and hyperreality (where symbols become a reality unto themselves). The substance of the myth appeal is narrative, or undercurrents of stories used in the place of argument. Here, I offer four examples to display these tensions; the first is an "action-figure" toy line to illustrate how an existing mythology from comics conveys ideological values; the second is a post 09/11 comic book series which used hyperreality to critique social norms; the third is Alan Sokal's academic hoax , which showed a cultural tension across all three areas; and finally, a survey of U.S. Supreme Court decisions on privacy to discuss the emerging mythology of abortion. I conclude with a systematic approach to myth, and a brief discussion of additional persuasive appeals.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subjectLanguageen_US
dc.subjectMythen_US
dc.subjectNarrativeen_US
dc.subjectRhetoricen_US
dc.subjectSemioticsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAllister, Kenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWaugh, Lindaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10635en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753377en_US
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