OPTICAL METHODS FOR MOLECULAR SENSING: SUPPLEMENTING IMAGING OF TISSUE MICROSTRUCTURE WITH MOLECULAR INFORMATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195176
Title:
OPTICAL METHODS FOR MOLECULAR SENSING: SUPPLEMENTING IMAGING OF TISSUE MICROSTRUCTURE WITH MOLECULAR INFORMATION
Author:
Winkler, Amy
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
More and more researchers and clinicians are looking to molecular sensing to predict how cells will behave, seeking the answers to questions like "will these tumor cells become malignant?" or "how will these cells respond to chemotherapy?" Optical methods are attractive for answering these questions because optical radiation is safer and less expensive than alternative methods, such as CT which uses X-ray radiation, PET/SPECT which use gamma radiation, or MRI which is expensive and only available in a hospital setting. In this dissertation, three distinct optical methods are explored to detect at the molecular level: optical coherence tomography (OCT), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and optical polarimetry. OCT has the capability to simultaneously capture anatomical information as well as molecular information using targeted contrast agents such as gold nanoshells. LIF is less useful for capturing anatomical information, but it can achieve significantly better molecular sensitivity with the use of targeted fluorescent dyes. Optical polarimetry has potential to detect the concentration of helical molecules, such as glucose. All of these methods are noninvasive or minimally invasive.The work is organized into four specific aims. The first is the design and implementation of a fast, high resolution, endoscopic OCT system to facilitate minimally invasive mouse colon imaging. The second aim is to demonstrate the utility of this system for automatically identifying tumor lesions based on tissue microstructure. The third is to demonstrate the use of contrast agents to detect molecular expression using OCT and LIF. The last aim is to demonstrate a new method based on optical polarimetry for noninvasive glucose sensing.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
fluorescence; molecular imaging; optical coherence tomography; optical imaging; polarimetry
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barton, Jennifer K.
Committee Chair:
Barton, Jennifer K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOPTICAL METHODS FOR MOLECULAR SENSING: SUPPLEMENTING IMAGING OF TISSUE MICROSTRUCTURE WITH MOLECULAR INFORMATIONen_US
dc.creatorWinkler, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWinkler, Amyen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMore and more researchers and clinicians are looking to molecular sensing to predict how cells will behave, seeking the answers to questions like "will these tumor cells become malignant?" or "how will these cells respond to chemotherapy?" Optical methods are attractive for answering these questions because optical radiation is safer and less expensive than alternative methods, such as CT which uses X-ray radiation, PET/SPECT which use gamma radiation, or MRI which is expensive and only available in a hospital setting. In this dissertation, three distinct optical methods are explored to detect at the molecular level: optical coherence tomography (OCT), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and optical polarimetry. OCT has the capability to simultaneously capture anatomical information as well as molecular information using targeted contrast agents such as gold nanoshells. LIF is less useful for capturing anatomical information, but it can achieve significantly better molecular sensitivity with the use of targeted fluorescent dyes. Optical polarimetry has potential to detect the concentration of helical molecules, such as glucose. All of these methods are noninvasive or minimally invasive.The work is organized into four specific aims. The first is the design and implementation of a fast, high resolution, endoscopic OCT system to facilitate minimally invasive mouse colon imaging. The second aim is to demonstrate the utility of this system for automatically identifying tumor lesions based on tissue microstructure. The third is to demonstrate the use of contrast agents to detect molecular expression using OCT and LIF. The last aim is to demonstrate a new method based on optical polarimetry for noninvasive glucose sensing.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectfluorescenceen_US
dc.subjectmolecular imagingen_US
dc.subjectoptical coherence tomographyen_US
dc.subjectoptical imagingen_US
dc.subjectpolarimetryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarton, Jennifer K.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBarton, Jennifer K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUtzinger, Ursen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKostuk, Rayen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10928en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754827en_US
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