Narrativity, Emplotment, and Voice in Autobiographical and Cinematic Representations of "Mentally Ill" Women, 1942-2003

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195156
Title:
Narrativity, Emplotment, and Voice in Autobiographical and Cinematic Representations of "Mentally Ill" Women, 1942-2003
Author:
Wiener, Diane Rochelle
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation presents an historical overview of the interdependent representations of gender, class, ethnicity, race, nationality, sexuality, and (dis)ability in a selection of films and first-person written autobiographical texts from the 1940s to the early twenty-first century. Cinematic and written autobiographical representations of “mental illness” reflect and shape various models of psychological trauma and wellness. I explore the ways that these two genres of representation underscore, exert influence upon, and interrogate socio-cultural understandings and interpretations of deviance and normalcy, madness and sanity, and pathology and health. Some models of health and illness carry more ideological weight than others, and thus differentially contour public policy formation and the materiality of people’s daily lives. My project is distinct from other kinds of scholarship on the subject of women’s “madness.” Whereas scholarship has been written on “madness” and cinema, and on “madness” and autobiography, this related academic work has not consistently drawn linkages between multiple genres or utilized interdisciplinary methodologies to critically explore texts. Feminist scholars who address the interconnections between autobiographies and cinematic representations often pay only limited attention to psychiatric survivors. I draw parallels and distinctions between these genres, based upon my training in social work, cultural studies, film and autobiography theory, medical and linguistic anthropology, and disability studies. My perspective hinges upon my longstanding involvement with and commitment to the subject of women’s “madness” in both personal and professional arenas.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
American cultural studies; interdisciplinary; psychiatric survivor movement; medical anthropology; disability studies; queer theory
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Comparative Cultural & Literary Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Babcock, Barbara A.; White, Susan M.
Committee Chair:
Babcock, Barbara A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleNarrativity, Emplotment, and Voice in Autobiographical and Cinematic Representations of "Mentally Ill" Women, 1942-2003en_US
dc.creatorWiener, Diane Rochelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorWiener, Diane Rochelleen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation presents an historical overview of the interdependent representations of gender, class, ethnicity, race, nationality, sexuality, and (dis)ability in a selection of films and first-person written autobiographical texts from the 1940s to the early twenty-first century. Cinematic and written autobiographical representations of “mental illness” reflect and shape various models of psychological trauma and wellness. I explore the ways that these two genres of representation underscore, exert influence upon, and interrogate socio-cultural understandings and interpretations of deviance and normalcy, madness and sanity, and pathology and health. Some models of health and illness carry more ideological weight than others, and thus differentially contour public policy formation and the materiality of people’s daily lives. My project is distinct from other kinds of scholarship on the subject of women’s “madness.” Whereas scholarship has been written on “madness” and cinema, and on “madness” and autobiography, this related academic work has not consistently drawn linkages between multiple genres or utilized interdisciplinary methodologies to critically explore texts. Feminist scholars who address the interconnections between autobiographies and cinematic representations often pay only limited attention to psychiatric survivors. I draw parallels and distinctions between these genres, based upon my training in social work, cultural studies, film and autobiography theory, medical and linguistic anthropology, and disability studies. My perspective hinges upon my longstanding involvement with and commitment to the subject of women’s “madness” in both personal and professional arenas.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAmerican cultural studiesen_US
dc.subjectinterdisciplinaryen_US
dc.subjectpsychiatric survivor movementen_US
dc.subjectmedical anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectdisability studiesen_US
dc.subjectqueer theoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural & Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBabcock, Barbara A.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorWhite, Susan M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBabcock, Barbara A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Susan M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobinson, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSeckinger, Beverlyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1043en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355747en_US
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