Pugkeenga: Assessing the Sustainability of Household Extension and Fragmentation under Scenarios of Global Change

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195139
Title:
Pugkeenga: Assessing the Sustainability of Household Extension and Fragmentation under Scenarios of Global Change
Author:
West, Colin Thor
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation explores the sustainability of the pugkêenga system of household cooperation as practiced by Mossi rural producers on the Central Plateau of Burkina Faso. Consistent with the sustainable livelihoods framework, this dissertation systematically compares the assets of two different types of domestic organization found among Mossi domestic groups today: extended and nuclear households. Similar studies in contemporary West Africa and other parts of the world suggest that globalization and modernization make extended forms of household organization unsustainable and impractical in the face of changing ecologies and the penetration of capitalist modes of production. This study challenges such assertions and contends that the material and moral configurations of extended households actually enhances their sustainability in the face of environmental and social change. The Sahel region, in which the fieldwork took place, has undergone a period of prolonged desiccation. The Central Plateau is also one of the most densely populated areas within the Sahel. These factors contribute to the high rate of migration for which the Mossi and Central Plateau are well-known. This research investigates these dynamics with ethnographic fieldwork, statistical analyses, and agent based modeling. The results of these analyses demonstrate that the pugkêenga system of household cooperation enhances the household livelihood sustainability under increased climate variability, population pressure, and migration.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
sustainability; global change; Mossi: livelihoods: Burkina Faso
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Baro, Mamadou A
Committee Chair:
Baro, Mamadou A

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePugkeenga: Assessing the Sustainability of Household Extension and Fragmentation under Scenarios of Global Changeen_US
dc.creatorWest, Colin Thoren_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Colin Thoren_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the sustainability of the pugkêenga system of household cooperation as practiced by Mossi rural producers on the Central Plateau of Burkina Faso. Consistent with the sustainable livelihoods framework, this dissertation systematically compares the assets of two different types of domestic organization found among Mossi domestic groups today: extended and nuclear households. Similar studies in contemporary West Africa and other parts of the world suggest that globalization and modernization make extended forms of household organization unsustainable and impractical in the face of changing ecologies and the penetration of capitalist modes of production. This study challenges such assertions and contends that the material and moral configurations of extended households actually enhances their sustainability in the face of environmental and social change. The Sahel region, in which the fieldwork took place, has undergone a period of prolonged desiccation. The Central Plateau is also one of the most densely populated areas within the Sahel. These factors contribute to the high rate of migration for which the Mossi and Central Plateau are well-known. This research investigates these dynamics with ethnographic fieldwork, statistical analyses, and agent based modeling. The results of these analyses demonstrate that the pugkêenga system of household cooperation enhances the household livelihood sustainability under increased climate variability, population pressure, and migration.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectsustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectglobal changeen_US
dc.subjectMossi: livelihoods: Burkina Fasoen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBaro, Mamadou Aen_US
dc.contributor.chairBaro, Mamadou Aen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFinan, Timothy J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, J. Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberComrie, Andrew C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1829en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746356en_US
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