Oklahoma Women Preachers, Pioneers, and Pentecostals: An Analysis of the Elements of Collective and Individual Ethos Within the Selected Writings of Women Preachers of the International Pentecostal Holiness Church

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195131
Title:
Oklahoma Women Preachers, Pioneers, and Pentecostals: An Analysis of the Elements of Collective and Individual Ethos Within the Selected Writings of Women Preachers of the International Pentecostal Holiness Church
Author:
Welch, Kristen
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation, I argue that ethos is generative as James Corder defines it. I seek to show that women preachers of the International Pentecostal Holiness Church who spent a significant amount of their careers in Oklahoma generated an ethos in their autobiographical texts and transcribed, edited interviews that constructed individualized as well as a social instantiations of ethos. I rhetorically analyzed these texts using five categories of ethos as a rubric for making connections between Corderian theory and my case studies: ethos as transformation, ethos as wisdom or authority, ethos in the stated motives and purposes in a text, ethos as charisma, and ethos as dynamic processes built from identification. In chapter one, I lay out my theoretical perspective, situating it within the canonical history of rhetoric. In chapter two, I describe the historical and religious contexts that put my study of women preachers into a wide conversation of views on women preachers and show how my work is a participation in and a continuation of such conversations. In chapter three, I focus on the autobiographical texts from the late nineteenth through the middle twentieth centuries, comparing male constructions of ethos to female from members of the same group. In chapter four, I make connections between the older texts of chapter three and the twenty-first century interviews I collected and transcribed in 2004 in order to demonstrate paradigm shifts that have occurred, as well as to show how new instantiations of ethos are grounded in localized histories as well as larger ones. In chapter five, I turn to a discussion of the nature of truth inside of epistemic rhetorics. Since generative ethos is aligned with epistemic rhetoric, how we construct ethos within a group is tied to our sense of the nature of truth. Particularly interesting is my connection of truth and ethos to the Holy Spirit.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Corder; Generative Ethos; Women Preachers; Pentecostal
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Enos, Theresa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOklahoma Women Preachers, Pioneers, and Pentecostals: An Analysis of the Elements of Collective and Individual Ethos Within the Selected Writings of Women Preachers of the International Pentecostal Holiness Churchen_US
dc.creatorWelch, Kristenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Kristenen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I argue that ethos is generative as James Corder defines it. I seek to show that women preachers of the International Pentecostal Holiness Church who spent a significant amount of their careers in Oklahoma generated an ethos in their autobiographical texts and transcribed, edited interviews that constructed individualized as well as a social instantiations of ethos. I rhetorically analyzed these texts using five categories of ethos as a rubric for making connections between Corderian theory and my case studies: ethos as transformation, ethos as wisdom or authority, ethos in the stated motives and purposes in a text, ethos as charisma, and ethos as dynamic processes built from identification. In chapter one, I lay out my theoretical perspective, situating it within the canonical history of rhetoric. In chapter two, I describe the historical and religious contexts that put my study of women preachers into a wide conversation of views on women preachers and show how my work is a participation in and a continuation of such conversations. In chapter three, I focus on the autobiographical texts from the late nineteenth through the middle twentieth centuries, comparing male constructions of ethos to female from members of the same group. In chapter four, I make connections between the older texts of chapter three and the twenty-first century interviews I collected and transcribed in 2004 in order to demonstrate paradigm shifts that have occurred, as well as to show how new instantiations of ethos are grounded in localized histories as well as larger ones. In chapter five, I turn to a discussion of the nature of truth inside of epistemic rhetorics. Since generative ethos is aligned with epistemic rhetoric, how we construct ethos within a group is tied to our sense of the nature of truth. Particularly interesting is my connection of truth and ethos to the Holy Spirit.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCorderen_US
dc.subjectGenerative Ethosen_US
dc.subjectWomen Preachersen_US
dc.subjectPentecostalen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHea, Amy C. Kimmeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSynan, Vinsonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2020en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747150en_US
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