Latitudinal Patterns of New World Species Diversity and Range Size

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195130
Title:
Latitudinal Patterns of New World Species Diversity and Range Size
Author:
Weiser, Michael Dennis
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The latitudinal gradient in species diversity is one of the best-documented patterns in biogeography. Explanations for the latitudinal gradient in species diversity (LGSD) ranging from null models to evolutionary and ecological hypotheses rely on relationships between range size and species richness. I test Rapoport's rule, where mean range size of tropical organism is predicted to be smaller than for temperate and boreal organisms, using New World woody plants. Geometric constraint models (GCMs) posit that barriers to dispersal, in the absence of ecological and evolutionary gradients can generate gradients in species diversity. I describe an analytic solution for the most common geometric constraint model and test expected and observed richness patterns for New World palms. I show that domain truncation will inevitably and spuriously increase the predictive power of GCMs while potentially decreasing the predictive power of other competitor variables. The LGSD is often considered a general pattern driven by general processes. Assuming that generality of pattern may reflect generality of process, I examine the LGSDs for New World mammal orders and families, testing for generality in two components of the LGSD, shape and peak. The overall LGSD is not a general pattern for across mammal orders and families and therefore it is unlikely that the LGSD is generated by a shared general mechanism or historical process.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enquist, Brian J.
Committee Chair:
Enquist, Brian J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLatitudinal Patterns of New World Species Diversity and Range Sizeen_US
dc.creatorWeiser, Michael Dennisen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeiser, Michael Dennisen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe latitudinal gradient in species diversity is one of the best-documented patterns in biogeography. Explanations for the latitudinal gradient in species diversity (LGSD) ranging from null models to evolutionary and ecological hypotheses rely on relationships between range size and species richness. I test Rapoport's rule, where mean range size of tropical organism is predicted to be smaller than for temperate and boreal organisms, using New World woody plants. Geometric constraint models (GCMs) posit that barriers to dispersal, in the absence of ecological and evolutionary gradients can generate gradients in species diversity. I describe an analytic solution for the most common geometric constraint model and test expected and observed richness patterns for New World palms. I show that domain truncation will inevitably and spuriously increase the predictive power of GCMs while potentially decreasing the predictive power of other competitor variables. The LGSD is often considered a general pattern driven by general processes. Assuming that generality of pattern may reflect generality of process, I examine the LGSDs for New World mammal orders and families, testing for generality in two components of the LGSD, shape and peak. The overall LGSD is not a general pattern for across mammal orders and families and therefore it is unlikely that the LGSD is generated by a shared general mechanism or historical process.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnquist, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairEnquist, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConway, Courtneyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFlessa, Karlen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobichaux, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenzweig, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2496en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748459en_US
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