Gender, Genre, and the Eroticization of Violence in Early Modern English Literature

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195129
Title:
Gender, Genre, and the Eroticization of Violence in Early Modern English Literature
Author:
Weise, Wendy Suzanne
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In an analysis of literary and historical documents from the sixteenth to the early eighteenth centuries, Gender, Genre, and the Eroticization of Violence in Early Modern English Literature examines depictions of love, beauty, and desire and identifies within these discourses a rhetoric of violence. It explores how eroticized violence can be deployed to privilege male speakers and silence female voices. It also reveals, by pairing female- and male-authored works that make specific claims to represent gendered experience that early modern writers both recognized the mechanisms of violent representation as literary conventions and realized they could be deployed, exploited, resisted, fashioned to new ends. By integrating feminist psychoanalytic, film and architectural theories with literary analysis, this study demonstrates how spatial topographies in literary works can function as stimuli that provoke desire to turn violent. Gender, Genre, and the Eroticization of Violence ultimately identifies how this body of literature constructs and maintains genders and points to violence as a structural principle, bound by the hydraulics of subjectivity and cultural anxieties about gender, class, and literary production. Finally, this study identifies the residue of early modern ideas about desire and violence in the materials of our modern culture.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Gender; Authorship; Subjectivity; Desire; Related to Violence; Feminist Theory and Criticism
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brown, Meg L.
Committee Chair:
Brown, Meg L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGender, Genre, and the Eroticization of Violence in Early Modern English Literatureen_US
dc.creatorWeise, Wendy Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeise, Wendy Suzanneen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn an analysis of literary and historical documents from the sixteenth to the early eighteenth centuries, Gender, Genre, and the Eroticization of Violence in Early Modern English Literature examines depictions of love, beauty, and desire and identifies within these discourses a rhetoric of violence. It explores how eroticized violence can be deployed to privilege male speakers and silence female voices. It also reveals, by pairing female- and male-authored works that make specific claims to represent gendered experience that early modern writers both recognized the mechanisms of violent representation as literary conventions and realized they could be deployed, exploited, resisted, fashioned to new ends. By integrating feminist psychoanalytic, film and architectural theories with literary analysis, this study demonstrates how spatial topographies in literary works can function as stimuli that provoke desire to turn violent. Gender, Genre, and the Eroticization of Violence ultimately identifies how this body of literature constructs and maintains genders and points to violence as a structural principle, bound by the hydraulics of subjectivity and cultural anxieties about gender, class, and literary production. Finally, this study identifies the residue of early modern ideas about desire and violence in the materials of our modern culture.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectAuthorshipen_US
dc.subjectSubjectivityen_US
dc.subjectDesireen_US
dc.subjectRelated to Violenceen_US
dc.subjectFeminist Theory and Criticismen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Meg L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBrown, Meg L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcBride, Kari Boyden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAiken, Susan Hardyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2478en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748396en_US
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