CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO RECENT PHONOLOGICAL CHANGES IN JAPANESE

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195117
Title:
CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO RECENT PHONOLOGICAL CHANGES IN JAPANESE
Author:
Watanabe, Seiji
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigates innovative sound sequences in Japanese. A relatively large number of phonological changes have occurred in the short period of time since WWII, mainly due to an influx of loanwords from English. However, innovative sound sequences have not been accepted in Japanese uniformly. This fact raises two questions. Why are some innovative sound sequences fully accepted in Japanese while others are still foreignisms? Why are certain sound sequences acceptable in one situation, but not so in others?Previous studies on innovative sound sequences in modern standard Japanese have tried to solve these problems by establishing innovative lexical strata, such as "Assimilated Foreign" and "Unassimilated Foreign." However, this study found that the distribution of innovative sound sequences is much more complex than previously believed. Furthermore, in many cases, the acceptance of innovative sound sequences is word-by-word or speaker-by-speaker. This suggests that the cause of the distribution of innovative sound sequences in Japanese is better described as an intricate interaction among various extra-grammatical factors, such as processes of borrowing, speakers' socioeconomic status, influence of English education, acoustic and articulatory phonetics, the writing system, and historical linguistic factors.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
historical; Japanese; loanword; phonology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Vance, Timothy J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO RECENT PHONOLOGICAL CHANGES IN JAPANESEen_US
dc.creatorWatanabe, Seijien_US
dc.contributor.authorWatanabe, Seijien_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates innovative sound sequences in Japanese. A relatively large number of phonological changes have occurred in the short period of time since WWII, mainly due to an influx of loanwords from English. However, innovative sound sequences have not been accepted in Japanese uniformly. This fact raises two questions. Why are some innovative sound sequences fully accepted in Japanese while others are still foreignisms? Why are certain sound sequences acceptable in one situation, but not so in others?Previous studies on innovative sound sequences in modern standard Japanese have tried to solve these problems by establishing innovative lexical strata, such as "Assimilated Foreign" and "Unassimilated Foreign." However, this study found that the distribution of innovative sound sequences is much more complex than previously believed. Furthermore, in many cases, the acceptance of innovative sound sequences is word-by-word or speaker-by-speaker. This suggests that the cause of the distribution of innovative sound sequences in Japanese is better described as an intricate interaction among various extra-grammatical factors, such as processes of borrowing, speakers' socioeconomic status, influence of English education, acoustic and articulatory phonetics, the writing system, and historical linguistic factors.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecthistoricalen_US
dc.subjectJapaneseen_US
dc.subjectloanworden_US
dc.subjectphonologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVance, Timothy J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUssishkin, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Kimberlyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10627en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753367en_US
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