Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195111
Title:
1,4-Dioxane Remediation Using a Constructed Wetland
Author:
Ward, William Jackson
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research addressed the question whether a constructed wetland system with phytoremediation could successfully uptake 1,4-Dioxane in groundwater and secondary effluent. It further addressed whether open pond storage could successfully treat wetland discharge. The project was located at the University of Arizona's Constructed Ecosystems Research Facility (CERF) in Tucson, Arizona. This two-year field study was motivated by previous laboratory studies which demonstrated the capability of plants to remediate the recalcitrant contaminant 1,4-Dioxane.The study was conducted in two open steel tanks configured to simulate constructed wetlands. The efficacy of 1,4-Dioxane uptake by cottonwood trees was tested in a side-by-side comparison utilizing planted and unplanted tanks. The sub-surface hydraulic conditions were fully characterized by bromide tracer studies. Six experiments were conducted, in which tapwater or secondary effluent was spiked with 5.2 mg/L 1,4-Dioxane and fed to the planted and unplanted (control) tank. The tank discharges were retained in separate open ponds to test if open pond storage would reduce 1,4-Dioxane content. Additional side experiments were conducted to examine the role of volatilization and UV degradation. Comparison of 1,4-Dioxane mass discharge from the planted and the control tank demonstrated an 18-48 percent uptake by the cottonwood trees. Mass balance assessments showed 1,4-Dioxane uptake efficiency was positively correlated to cottonwood transpiration rates in the planted tank. The open pond 1,4-Dioxane measurements demonstrated a 64-85 percent reduction in 1,4-Dioxane concentration due to volatilization during the initial 120 hours pond lapse time. Elimination of 1,4-Dioxane from the ponds followed first order kinetics. Field and laboratory side experiments demonstrated the potential for UV photo degradation of 1-4-Dioxane.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
dioxane; remediation; wetland; volatilization
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Arid Lands Resource Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Quanrud, David M.
Committee Chair:
Quanrud, David M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.title1,4-Dioxane Remediation Using a Constructed Wetlanden_US
dc.creatorWard, William Jacksonen_US
dc.contributor.authorWard, William Jacksonen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research addressed the question whether a constructed wetland system with phytoremediation could successfully uptake 1,4-Dioxane in groundwater and secondary effluent. It further addressed whether open pond storage could successfully treat wetland discharge. The project was located at the University of Arizona's Constructed Ecosystems Research Facility (CERF) in Tucson, Arizona. This two-year field study was motivated by previous laboratory studies which demonstrated the capability of plants to remediate the recalcitrant contaminant 1,4-Dioxane.The study was conducted in two open steel tanks configured to simulate constructed wetlands. The efficacy of 1,4-Dioxane uptake by cottonwood trees was tested in a side-by-side comparison utilizing planted and unplanted tanks. The sub-surface hydraulic conditions were fully characterized by bromide tracer studies. Six experiments were conducted, in which tapwater or secondary effluent was spiked with 5.2 mg/L 1,4-Dioxane and fed to the planted and unplanted (control) tank. The tank discharges were retained in separate open ponds to test if open pond storage would reduce 1,4-Dioxane content. Additional side experiments were conducted to examine the role of volatilization and UV degradation. Comparison of 1,4-Dioxane mass discharge from the planted and the control tank demonstrated an 18-48 percent uptake by the cottonwood trees. Mass balance assessments showed 1,4-Dioxane uptake efficiency was positively correlated to cottonwood transpiration rates in the planted tank. The open pond 1,4-Dioxane measurements demonstrated a 64-85 percent reduction in 1,4-Dioxane concentration due to volatilization during the initial 120 hours pond lapse time. Elimination of 1,4-Dioxane from the ponds followed first order kinetics. Field and laboratory side experiments demonstrated the potential for UV photo degradation of 1-4-Dioxane.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectdioxaneen_US
dc.subjectremediationen_US
dc.subjectwetlanden_US
dc.subjectvolatilizationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorQuanrud, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairQuanrud, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKarpiscak, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarsh, Stuarten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHutchinson, Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2735en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749758en_US
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