UTILITY-BASED RESOURCE ALLOCATION STRATEGIES AND PROTOCOL DESIGN FOR SPECTRUM-ADAPTIVE WIRELESS NETWORKS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195088
Title:
UTILITY-BASED RESOURCE ALLOCATION STRATEGIES AND PROTOCOL DESIGN FOR SPECTRUM-ADAPTIVE WIRELESS NETWORKS
Author:
Wang, Fan
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Resource allocation strategies, including power control, rate adaptation, and dynamic spectrum access, have been the keys to improving the performance of dynamic (mobile) wireless networks. In this dissertation, we propose several resource optimization schemes for various wireless network architectures, with the goal of maximizing the system throughput and/or minimizing the total energy consumption. These schemes are integrated into the design of distributed medium-access control (MAC) protocols. We propose a game theoretic power control scheme for single-channel ad-hoc networks, and design an efficient MAC protocol, called GMAC, that implements such a scheme in a distributed fashion. GMAC allows for multiple potential transmitters to contend for the channel through an admission phase that these transmitters to determine their appropriate transmission powers. Successful contenders proceed concurrently following the admission phase. We then study the operation of spectrum-agile (cognitive) radios in multi-channel, multi-hop wireless network setting. Two principal cases are considered: exclusive-occupancy and interference-based channel models. For the case of exclusive-occupancy channel models, we design a MAC protocol that exploits the "dual receive" capabilities of the radios to maximize the network throughput. We then propose a cross-layer framework for joint adaptive load/medium access controls. Under this framework, the traffic loads of individual node are adapted based on local MAC parameters. For the case of interference-based channel models, when system throughput is the primary performance metric, we apply "price-based" iterative water-filling (PIWF) algorithms for resource allocation. When energy consumption is the primary metric, we propose a selfish update algorithm and an incentive-based update algorithm for minimizing the power consumption while satisfying the rate and power mask requirements. These algorithms are implemented by having nodes repeatedly negotiate their best power/spectrum to reach a good Nash Equilibrium. An efficient multi-channel MAC protocol is proposed to facilitate the radio negotiation and convergence phase. Simulation results indicate that our proposed protocols achieve significant throughput/energy improvements over existing protocols.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Electrical & Computer Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Krunz, Marwan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleUTILITY-BASED RESOURCE ALLOCATION STRATEGIES AND PROTOCOL DESIGN FOR SPECTRUM-ADAPTIVE WIRELESS NETWORKSen_US
dc.creatorWang, Fanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Fanen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResource allocation strategies, including power control, rate adaptation, and dynamic spectrum access, have been the keys to improving the performance of dynamic (mobile) wireless networks. In this dissertation, we propose several resource optimization schemes for various wireless network architectures, with the goal of maximizing the system throughput and/or minimizing the total energy consumption. These schemes are integrated into the design of distributed medium-access control (MAC) protocols. We propose a game theoretic power control scheme for single-channel ad-hoc networks, and design an efficient MAC protocol, called GMAC, that implements such a scheme in a distributed fashion. GMAC allows for multiple potential transmitters to contend for the channel through an admission phase that these transmitters to determine their appropriate transmission powers. Successful contenders proceed concurrently following the admission phase. We then study the operation of spectrum-agile (cognitive) radios in multi-channel, multi-hop wireless network setting. Two principal cases are considered: exclusive-occupancy and interference-based channel models. For the case of exclusive-occupancy channel models, we design a MAC protocol that exploits the "dual receive" capabilities of the radios to maximize the network throughput. We then propose a cross-layer framework for joint adaptive load/medium access controls. Under this framework, the traffic loads of individual node are adapted based on local MAC parameters. For the case of interference-based channel models, when system throughput is the primary performance metric, we apply "price-based" iterative water-filling (PIWF) algorithms for resource allocation. When energy consumption is the primary metric, we propose a selfish update algorithm and an incentive-based update algorithm for minimizing the power consumption while satisfying the rate and power mask requirements. These algorithms are implemented by having nodes repeatedly negotiate their best power/spectrum to reach a good Nash Equilibrium. An efficient multi-channel MAC protocol is proposed to facilitate the radio negotiation and convergence phase. Simulation results indicate that our proposed protocols achieve significant throughput/energy improvements over existing protocols.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKrunz, Marwanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, William E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLazos, Loukasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10645en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753384en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.