Attachment Patterns Relationship to Intelligence and Academic Achievement in School-Age Children

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195072
Title:
Attachment Patterns Relationship to Intelligence and Academic Achievement in School-Age Children
Author:
Wacha, Victoria Helen
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the links among children's representations of attachment and their intelligence and academic achievement. John Bowlby's attachment theory is the framework used in this study to understand and explain differences in children's intelligence and academic achievement. Bowlby maintained that the quality of children's attachment to their caregivers exerts a strong influence on their ability and interest in investigating their environment. According to attachment theory, the quality of children's attachment to their primary caregivers would be expected to be associated with their intelligence and scholastic achievement. The findings from this study suggest that attachment patterns are significantly related to children's crystallized intelligence, which involves learning, knowledge and skills that are accumulated from past experiences. Attachment patterns were not significantly related to children's global intelligence or their academic achievement. The results of this study are relevant not only to attachment researchers but also school psychologists, parents, and teachers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Academic Achievement; Attachment; Intelligence
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
School Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Obrzut, John E.
Committee Chair:
Obrzut, John E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAttachment Patterns Relationship to Intelligence and Academic Achievement in School-Age Childrenen_US
dc.creatorWacha, Victoria Helenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWacha, Victoria Helenen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the links among children's representations of attachment and their intelligence and academic achievement. John Bowlby's attachment theory is the framework used in this study to understand and explain differences in children's intelligence and academic achievement. Bowlby maintained that the quality of children's attachment to their caregivers exerts a strong influence on their ability and interest in investigating their environment. According to attachment theory, the quality of children's attachment to their primary caregivers would be expected to be associated with their intelligence and scholastic achievement. The findings from this study suggest that attachment patterns are significantly related to children's crystallized intelligence, which involves learning, knowledge and skills that are accumulated from past experiences. Attachment patterns were not significantly related to children's global intelligence or their academic achievement. The results of this study are relevant not only to attachment researchers but also school psychologists, parents, and teachers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAcademic Achievementen_US
dc.subjectAttachmenten_US
dc.subjectIntelligenceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorObrzut, John E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairObrzut, John E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberObrzut, John E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jeffen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10859en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753767en_US
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