Water Conservation in Biofuels Development: Greenhouse and Field Crop Production with Biochar

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195060
Title:
Water Conservation in Biofuels Development: Greenhouse and Field Crop Production with Biochar
Author:
Villarreal Manzo, Luis Alberto
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Biochar incorporation in soils has the potential to remove carbon from the atmosphere and to improve soil quality. This research focused on evaluation of the benefit of biochar incorporation in an Arizona soil. Different concentrations of biochar (charcoal from mesquite biomass-derived black carbon) were added to soil in greenhouse experiments. Seven common or potential Southern Arizona crops (alfalfa, wheat, cotton, grain and sweet sorghum, barley and switch grass) were evaluated in the greenhouse experiment. In this experiment; increased biochar concentration treatments produced greater height and biomass production in alfalfa. Sorghum biomass production also increased with biochar concentration. There were no significant differences in biomass production in wheat and barley with increased biochar concentration. Switch grass biomass production had a significant negative correlation with increased biochar concentration. Sweet sorghum biomass production was evaluated in a field experiment conducted at the University of Arizona Red Rock Agricultural Center. A relatively small amount of biochar was incorporated in the top 20 cm of soil in one treatment and soil only was the other treatment: there were no significant differences in yield.Water characteristic curves and bulk densities were measured for biochar/soil mixes. The FASE model was used to simulate evapotranspiration and crop yield for the field sorghum experiment and for several crops grown in the Valsequillo Irrigation District, Puebla, Mexico with measured soil parameters. The model predicted no significant increase in sorghum yield for the level of biochar incorporated in the soil. An increase in yield was predicted for Valsequillo crops.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Biochar; Biofuels; Conservation; Field; Greenhouse; Water
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Waller, Pete
Committee Chair:
Waller, Pete

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleWater Conservation in Biofuels Development: Greenhouse and Field Crop Production with Biocharen_US
dc.creatorVillarreal Manzo, Luis Albertoen_US
dc.contributor.authorVillarreal Manzo, Luis Albertoen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBiochar incorporation in soils has the potential to remove carbon from the atmosphere and to improve soil quality. This research focused on evaluation of the benefit of biochar incorporation in an Arizona soil. Different concentrations of biochar (charcoal from mesquite biomass-derived black carbon) were added to soil in greenhouse experiments. Seven common or potential Southern Arizona crops (alfalfa, wheat, cotton, grain and sweet sorghum, barley and switch grass) were evaluated in the greenhouse experiment. In this experiment; increased biochar concentration treatments produced greater height and biomass production in alfalfa. Sorghum biomass production also increased with biochar concentration. There were no significant differences in biomass production in wheat and barley with increased biochar concentration. Switch grass biomass production had a significant negative correlation with increased biochar concentration. Sweet sorghum biomass production was evaluated in a field experiment conducted at the University of Arizona Red Rock Agricultural Center. A relatively small amount of biochar was incorporated in the top 20 cm of soil in one treatment and soil only was the other treatment: there were no significant differences in yield.Water characteristic curves and bulk densities were measured for biochar/soil mixes. The FASE model was used to simulate evapotranspiration and crop yield for the field sorghum experiment and for several crops grown in the Valsequillo Irrigation District, Puebla, Mexico with measured soil parameters. The model predicted no significant increase in sorghum yield for the level of biochar incorporated in the soil. An increase in yield was predicted for Valsequillo crops.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBiocharen_US
dc.subjectBiofuelsen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.subjectFielden_US
dc.subjectGreenhouseen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWaller, Peteen_US
dc.contributor.chairWaller, Peteen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWaller, Peteen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlack, Donald C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYitayew, Mulunehen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHawkins, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest10207en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750803en_US
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