PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGINED COMMUNITIES IN AN ENGLISH LANGUAGE MAJOR IN MEXICO

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195059
Title:
PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGINED COMMUNITIES IN AN ENGLISH LANGUAGE MAJOR IN MEXICO
Author:
Villarreal Ballesteros, Ana Cecilia
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent work has shown the importance of identity in language learning and how the desire to belong to an imagined community drives individuals to invest in their learning (Norton, 2000). This work has documented that a mismatch between students' imagined community and the community envisioned by the teacher can have negative outcomes on students' learning trajectories. Other research has explored how institutional policies and their linked educational practices reflect differences in the imagined communities each institution sees their students potentially joining in the future (Kanno, 2003) and how reading materials and the discourses reflected in them can affect learners' visions of themselves(Pavlenko, 2003). However few studies have tried to document how an `imagined community' might be collectively constructed for others through a complex interaction of social and cultural structures, circulating discourses, institutional discourses, educational practices, group dynamics and personal histories that produce visions of potential identities (I) and their respective imagined communities (IC's) in which newcomers get socialized. There is a gap in current research on how `imagined communities' and `identities' for second language learners get constructed, circulated and made available to learners within institutional contexts.Through this qualitative study involving questionnaires and autobiographical research I studied the construction of imagined communities in an English language major in Mexico. I explored how professional identities and their related imagined communities are collectively constructed and made available to students in order to understand how institutions, programs administrators and faculty members could enhance the spread of successful professional identities and inspire/stimulate L2 speakers in their educational and professional trajectories.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
English major; foreign language; identity; imagined communities; second language acquisition
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Waugh, Linda R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePROFESSIONAL IDENTITY FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGINED COMMUNITIES IN AN ENGLISH LANGUAGE MAJOR IN MEXICOen_US
dc.creatorVillarreal Ballesteros, Ana Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorVillarreal Ballesteros, Ana Ceciliaen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent work has shown the importance of identity in language learning and how the desire to belong to an imagined community drives individuals to invest in their learning (Norton, 2000). This work has documented that a mismatch between students' imagined community and the community envisioned by the teacher can have negative outcomes on students' learning trajectories. Other research has explored how institutional policies and their linked educational practices reflect differences in the imagined communities each institution sees their students potentially joining in the future (Kanno, 2003) and how reading materials and the discourses reflected in them can affect learners' visions of themselves(Pavlenko, 2003). However few studies have tried to document how an `imagined community' might be collectively constructed for others through a complex interaction of social and cultural structures, circulating discourses, institutional discourses, educational practices, group dynamics and personal histories that produce visions of potential identities (I) and their respective imagined communities (IC's) in which newcomers get socialized. There is a gap in current research on how `imagined communities' and `identities' for second language learners get constructed, circulated and made available to learners within institutional contexts.Through this qualitative study involving questionnaires and autobiographical research I studied the construction of imagined communities in an English language major in Mexico. I explored how professional identities and their related imagined communities are collectively constructed and made available to students in order to understand how institutions, programs administrators and faculty members could enhance the spread of successful professional identities and inspire/stimulate L2 speakers in their educational and professional trajectories.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEnglish majoren_US
dc.subjectforeign languageen_US
dc.subjectidentityen_US
dc.subjectimagined communitiesen_US
dc.subjectsecond language acquisitionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWaugh, Linda R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaville-Troike, Murielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest11016en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754961en_US
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