NARRATED TRAVEL AND RHETORICAL TROPES: PRODUCING "THE TURK" IN THE TRAVEL WRITING OF CYPRUS, 1955-2005

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195057
Title:
NARRATED TRAVEL AND RHETORICAL TROPES: PRODUCING "THE TURK" IN THE TRAVEL WRITING OF CYPRUS, 1955-2005
Author:
Bowman, James William
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Travelers' experiences in Cyprus and the texts they produce in light of these encounters function rhetorically, informing cultural relations among people of different societies. When the efforts of these travel writers are taken to be rhetorical, critics position themselves to identify how ethics, politics, and aesthetics of narration and self-representation create the tropes that fix other people in ideological space. This analysis examines the production of difference in selected travel narratives set in Cyprus in the later modern era, which coincides with the rise of anti-colonial politics, nationalism, and globalization (1955-2005). To further focus the analysis, I attend mostly to the representation of "the Turk" in this textual genre. An introductory chapter examines the rhetorical situation of the travel text of Cyprus, exploring rhetorical and critical concepts such as ethos, rhetoric as popular culture, and tropology; it also surveys the landscape of Cyprus as a destination of travel and introduces some of the major texts to be considered. Subsequent chapters explore the rhetoric of narrated travel writing set in Cyprus according to its variations in style and historical epoch. The critique examines the ethics of narration and representation in memoirs, travelogues, political journalism, guide books, and ethnographies by a diverse range of writers including Lawrence Durrell, Colin Thubron, and Christopher Hitchens. A concluding chapter considers alternative, rhetorically self-conscious forms of travel and writing that suggest different possibilities for an ethical future of travel, travel narration, and cultural encounters.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cyprus; ethos; rhetoric; travel; tropes; Turk
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McAllister, Ken S
Committee Chair:
McAllister, Ken S

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleNARRATED TRAVEL AND RHETORICAL TROPES: PRODUCING "THE TURK" IN THE TRAVEL WRITING OF CYPRUS, 1955-2005en_US
dc.creatorBowman, James Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorBowman, James Williamen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTravelers' experiences in Cyprus and the texts they produce in light of these encounters function rhetorically, informing cultural relations among people of different societies. When the efforts of these travel writers are taken to be rhetorical, critics position themselves to identify how ethics, politics, and aesthetics of narration and self-representation create the tropes that fix other people in ideological space. This analysis examines the production of difference in selected travel narratives set in Cyprus in the later modern era, which coincides with the rise of anti-colonial politics, nationalism, and globalization (1955-2005). To further focus the analysis, I attend mostly to the representation of "the Turk" in this textual genre. An introductory chapter examines the rhetorical situation of the travel text of Cyprus, exploring rhetorical and critical concepts such as ethos, rhetoric as popular culture, and tropology; it also surveys the landscape of Cyprus as a destination of travel and introduces some of the major texts to be considered. Subsequent chapters explore the rhetoric of narrated travel writing set in Cyprus according to its variations in style and historical epoch. The critique examines the ethics of narration and representation in memoirs, travelogues, political journalism, guide books, and ethnographies by a diverse range of writers including Lawrence Durrell, Colin Thubron, and Christopher Hitchens. A concluding chapter considers alternative, rhetorically self-conscious forms of travel and writing that suggest different possibilities for an ethical future of travel, travel narration, and cultural encounters.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCyprusen_US
dc.subjectethosen_US
dc.subjectrhetoricen_US
dc.subjecttravelen_US
dc.subjecttropesen_US
dc.subjectTurken_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcAllister, Ken Sen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcAllister, Ken Sen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Edward Men_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSilverstein, Brianen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10377en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659751991en_US
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