Outstanding Teachers and Learner-Centered Teaching Practices at a Private Liberal Arts Institution

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195054
Title:
Outstanding Teachers and Learner-Centered Teaching Practices at a Private Liberal Arts Institution
Author:
Verst, Amy L.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Using a combined quantitative, qualitative approach, this study explores the teaching practices of outstanding faculty at a private, liberal arts institutions by posing questions that revolve around learner-centered teaching practices, characteristics of outstanding teachers, effective teaching, and pressures on the professoriate related to the phenomena of academic capitalism. Outstanding professors from the College of Arts and Sciences, and Schools of Business, Education, and Nursing were invited to participate in this research. Weimer's (2002) five learner-centered changes to teaching practice framed this investigative study. This conceptual framework consists of altering the role of the teacher, balancing power in the classroom between teacher and students, changing the function of course content, instilling student responsibilities for learning, and using different processes and purposes for evaluation that serve to guide teacher and students interactions throughout the course.The findings of the study suggest that faculty from the School of Education agree with and implement all five of Weimer's (2002) learner-centered changes to teaching practice. However, there is incongruence between the learner-centered teaching beliefs and learner-centered teaching practices of outstanding teachers from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Business and Nursing. This study seems to indicate that several pressures on the professoriate including the phenomena associated with academic capitalism affect teaching practices in the classroom. Existing learner-centered practice models can be informed by the salient findings of this study.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
academic capitalism; effective teaching; learner-center education; student-centered teaching; teaching practices; Weimer's (2002) five key changes to practice
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lee, Jenny
Committee Chair:
Lee, Jenny

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOutstanding Teachers and Learner-Centered Teaching Practices at a Private Liberal Arts Institutionen_US
dc.creatorVerst, Amy L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVerst, Amy L.en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing a combined quantitative, qualitative approach, this study explores the teaching practices of outstanding faculty at a private, liberal arts institutions by posing questions that revolve around learner-centered teaching practices, characteristics of outstanding teachers, effective teaching, and pressures on the professoriate related to the phenomena of academic capitalism. Outstanding professors from the College of Arts and Sciences, and Schools of Business, Education, and Nursing were invited to participate in this research. Weimer's (2002) five learner-centered changes to teaching practice framed this investigative study. This conceptual framework consists of altering the role of the teacher, balancing power in the classroom between teacher and students, changing the function of course content, instilling student responsibilities for learning, and using different processes and purposes for evaluation that serve to guide teacher and students interactions throughout the course.The findings of the study suggest that faculty from the School of Education agree with and implement all five of Weimer's (2002) learner-centered changes to teaching practice. However, there is incongruence between the learner-centered teaching beliefs and learner-centered teaching practices of outstanding teachers from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Business and Nursing. This study seems to indicate that several pressures on the professoriate including the phenomena associated with academic capitalism affect teaching practices in the classroom. Existing learner-centered practice models can be informed by the salient findings of this study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectacademic capitalismen_US
dc.subjecteffective teachingen_US
dc.subjectlearner-center educationen_US
dc.subjectstudent-centered teachingen_US
dc.subjectteaching practicesen_US
dc.subjectWeimer's (2002) five key changes to practiceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.chairLee, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMilem, Jeffrey F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeil-Amen, Regina J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10962en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754885en_US
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