Conservation Genetics of Black Bears in Arizona and Northern Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195033
Title:
Conservation Genetics of Black Bears in Arizona and Northern Mexico
Author:
Varas-Nelson, Angela Cora
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Because American black bears (Ursus americanus) are an important game species in Arizona and are endangered in México, an understanding of the population structure, gene flow, and connectivity are important for effective management. Black bears inhabit coniferous and broadleaf deciduous woodlands in southern Arizona and northern México, usually in sky islands (sky islands are mountains that rise from the desert and are isolated from each other). Because a single sky island is too small to support a viable bear population, black bears move through desert lowlands to reach other sky islands. My objective was to assess genetic structure, connectivity, and conservation implications for sky island black bears in southern Arizona and northern México. I addresses 4 components of bear ecology and genetics: a literature review of genetic information available for black bears in North America; the use of 2 mitochondrial DNA genes (Control Region and ATP synthase protein 8) to study the phylogenetic relationship of black bears from the sky islands of southern Arizona and northern México relative to all North America; the use of 10 microsatellite loci to detect the current genetic structure of black bears in the sky islands in Arizona and northern México; and the use of noninvasive samples collected from the field to determine bear density and population size for black bear in Sierra San Luis, Sonora, México. These studies provide information that can be used by biologists, land managers, and others to assist in the conservation of black bears and their habitat.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Black bears; Connectivity; Gene Flow; Genetic Structure; Molecular markers; Sky Islands
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Culver, Melanie; Krausman, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleConservation Genetics of Black Bears in Arizona and Northern Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorVaras-Nelson, Angela Coraen_US
dc.contributor.authorVaras-Nelson, Angela Coraen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBecause American black bears (Ursus americanus) are an important game species in Arizona and are endangered in México, an understanding of the population structure, gene flow, and connectivity are important for effective management. Black bears inhabit coniferous and broadleaf deciduous woodlands in southern Arizona and northern México, usually in sky islands (sky islands are mountains that rise from the desert and are isolated from each other). Because a single sky island is too small to support a viable bear population, black bears move through desert lowlands to reach other sky islands. My objective was to assess genetic structure, connectivity, and conservation implications for sky island black bears in southern Arizona and northern México. I addresses 4 components of bear ecology and genetics: a literature review of genetic information available for black bears in North America; the use of 2 mitochondrial DNA genes (Control Region and ATP synthase protein 8) to study the phylogenetic relationship of black bears from the sky islands of southern Arizona and northern México relative to all North America; the use of 10 microsatellite loci to detect the current genetic structure of black bears in the sky islands in Arizona and northern México; and the use of noninvasive samples collected from the field to determine bear density and population size for black bear in Sierra San Luis, Sonora, México. These studies provide information that can be used by biologists, land managers, and others to assist in the conservation of black bears and their habitat.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBlack bearsen_US
dc.subjectConnectivityen_US
dc.subjectGene Flowen_US
dc.subjectGenetic Structureen_US
dc.subjectMolecular markersen_US
dc.subjectSky Islandsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairCulver, Melanieen_US
dc.contributor.chairKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHammer, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobichaux, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest10976en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752260952en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.