Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195030
Title:
Aquaculture Development in the 21st Century: A Feasibility Study
Author:
VanderLugt, Kyle Richard
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Continued growth of the aquaculture industry is needed in the 21st century in response to increasing demand from inflated populations and declining wild fisheries capture. Meeting this demand will require bridging the gap between industrialized countries including the United States, and developing and least developed countries (e.g. Mexico, Uruguay, and Uganda). As the aquaculture industry becomes more globally interconnected, industrialized nations will likely be pressured to develop more sustainable practices which are natural resource conservative while developing countries will be pressured to increase production capacity and develop more intensive operations. Albeit with many inherent challenges, a globalized strategic plan is needed to bridge this gap. This dissertation identifies and discusses several of these inherent challenges. Firstly, potential business models are explored with the concept of how information technology can be utilized to integrate small-scale farms in multi-national agribusiness and also coordinate multi-national supply with global demand. Next, the economic impact of aquaculture development is explored. Economic multiplying models may be utilized to predict where aquaculture development will have the most significant and rapid economic impact on rural communities. Lastly, new systems of aquaculture technology are developed which are resource conservative and also have the potential to be scaled to meet industry needs. Re-circulating integrated agriculture-aquaculture (RIAA) systems combine fish and plant production whereby the nutrient rich aquaculture effluent is utilized to irrigate plants. The advantages and disadvantages of these experiments were discussed. While further research is needed to maximize the benefits of RIAA technology, the results demonstrate that these systems provide both economic and environmental benefits over traditional farming methods. Ultimately, this dissertation explores how novel technology can be implemented in strategic locations to provide a sustainable food supply capable of promoting economic growth through the distribution of seafood products to satisfy domestic and global demand.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Integrated Aquaculture; Operation Management; Resource Conservation; Strategic Development
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fitzsimmons, Kevin M
Committee Chair:
Fitzsimmons, Kevin M

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAquaculture Development in the 21st Century: A Feasibility Studyen_US
dc.creatorVanderLugt, Kyle Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorVanderLugt, Kyle Richarden_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractContinued growth of the aquaculture industry is needed in the 21st century in response to increasing demand from inflated populations and declining wild fisheries capture. Meeting this demand will require bridging the gap between industrialized countries including the United States, and developing and least developed countries (e.g. Mexico, Uruguay, and Uganda). As the aquaculture industry becomes more globally interconnected, industrialized nations will likely be pressured to develop more sustainable practices which are natural resource conservative while developing countries will be pressured to increase production capacity and develop more intensive operations. Albeit with many inherent challenges, a globalized strategic plan is needed to bridge this gap. This dissertation identifies and discusses several of these inherent challenges. Firstly, potential business models are explored with the concept of how information technology can be utilized to integrate small-scale farms in multi-national agribusiness and also coordinate multi-national supply with global demand. Next, the economic impact of aquaculture development is explored. Economic multiplying models may be utilized to predict where aquaculture development will have the most significant and rapid economic impact on rural communities. Lastly, new systems of aquaculture technology are developed which are resource conservative and also have the potential to be scaled to meet industry needs. Re-circulating integrated agriculture-aquaculture (RIAA) systems combine fish and plant production whereby the nutrient rich aquaculture effluent is utilized to irrigate plants. The advantages and disadvantages of these experiments were discussed. While further research is needed to maximize the benefits of RIAA technology, the results demonstrate that these systems provide both economic and environmental benefits over traditional farming methods. Ultimately, this dissertation explores how novel technology can be implemented in strategic locations to provide a sustainable food supply capable of promoting economic growth through the distribution of seafood products to satisfy domestic and global demand.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectIntegrated Aquacultureen_US
dc.subjectOperation Managementen_US
dc.subjectResource Conservationen_US
dc.subjectStrategic Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFitzsimmons, Kevin Men_US
dc.contributor.chairFitzsimmons, Kevin Men_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalworth, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSilvertooth, Jeffen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11150en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261005en_US
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