Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195027
Title:
Civil Religion in Tucson Immigrant Advocacy Groups
Author:
Van Ham, Lane
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation focuses on Derechos Humanos, Humane Borders and Samaritans, three Tucson, Arizona-based groups that seek to reduce the deaths of migrants illegally crossing into the United States from Mexico. Though the groups themselves are not religions, they use religious symbolism as part of their public rhetoric, arguing that immigrants are entitled to treatment and protection according to standards that are universal and pan-human. By advocating for the rights of immigrants regardless of their documentation, these groups have set off a wave of controversy that illustrates a significant contradiction in modernity. One the one hand, the modern idea of progress has been rationalized by organizing populations in the form of nation-states, yet modernity has also seen the spread of human rights and humanitarian philosophies stressing the fundamental unity of people irrespective of nationality. As a result, immigrant advocates have been both pilloried as traitors or criminals and praised as ethical visionaries. Based on participant-observation and interviews with members of these three organizations, I argue that although immigrant advocates are comfortable using nation-state-based identities, they do not prioritize them. Rather, they use religious meanings to express the need for a supranational paradigm of value that can guide polities of any scale.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Comparative Cultural & Literary Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Babcock, Barbara
Committee Chair:
Babcock, Barbara

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCivil Religion in Tucson Immigrant Advocacy Groupsen_US
dc.creatorVan Ham, Laneen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Ham, Laneen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation focuses on Derechos Humanos, Humane Borders and Samaritans, three Tucson, Arizona-based groups that seek to reduce the deaths of migrants illegally crossing into the United States from Mexico. Though the groups themselves are not religions, they use religious symbolism as part of their public rhetoric, arguing that immigrants are entitled to treatment and protection according to standards that are universal and pan-human. By advocating for the rights of immigrants regardless of their documentation, these groups have set off a wave of controversy that illustrates a significant contradiction in modernity. One the one hand, the modern idea of progress has been rationalized by organizing populations in the form of nation-states, yet modernity has also seen the spread of human rights and humanitarian philosophies stressing the fundamental unity of people irrespective of nationality. As a result, immigrant advocates have been both pilloried as traitors or criminals and praised as ethical visionaries. Based on participant-observation and interviews with members of these three organizations, I argue that although immigrant advocates are comfortable using nation-state-based identities, they do not prioritize them. Rather, they use religious meanings to express the need for a supranational paradigm of value that can guide polities of any scale.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural & Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBabcock, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.chairBabcock, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarker, Adeleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCompitello, Malcolmen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNava, Alexen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSeat, Karenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1578en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355985en_US
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