Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195019
Title:
Self & Implicit Memory
Author:
Valdiserri, Michael
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research has shown that information encoded self-referentially often promotes superior recall than that encoded relative to others, semantically, or perceptually. This finding has been labeled the Self-Reference Effect (SRE). However, prior investigations have only used explicit (i.e., conscious) tests of memory, neglecting the possibility that these results could be mediated by implicit (i.e., unconscious) memory processes. Moreover, there is minimal information on the neuropsychological processes that may be involved in self-referential memory, whether explicit or implicit. This study examined subjects' implicit and explicit memory for adjectives that had been encoded self-referentially, relative to an unknown other, and structurally. Furthermore, neuropsychological measures were given.The results suggest a complex relationship between levels of self-reference, self-awareness, memory, and the general neurological areas that may support these processes. Subsequent investigations should take into account the fact that implicit memory is likely to influence self-referential encoding and retrieval. Should these findings be replicated, it could potentially influence a broad base of theoretical work in cognitive psychology and neuroscience, as well as clinical work in the areas of: traumatic brain injury, certain psychiatric disorders, amnesia, age-related memory deficits, and anosognosia (unawareness of deficits).
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Self; memory; implicit; explicit; psychometric; retrieval
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Figueredo, Aurelio J.
Committee Chair:
Figueredo, Aurelio J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSelf & Implicit Memoryen_US
dc.creatorValdiserri, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorValdiserri, Michaelen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has shown that information encoded self-referentially often promotes superior recall than that encoded relative to others, semantically, or perceptually. This finding has been labeled the Self-Reference Effect (SRE). However, prior investigations have only used explicit (i.e., conscious) tests of memory, neglecting the possibility that these results could be mediated by implicit (i.e., unconscious) memory processes. Moreover, there is minimal information on the neuropsychological processes that may be involved in self-referential memory, whether explicit or implicit. This study examined subjects' implicit and explicit memory for adjectives that had been encoded self-referentially, relative to an unknown other, and structurally. Furthermore, neuropsychological measures were given.The results suggest a complex relationship between levels of self-reference, self-awareness, memory, and the general neurological areas that may support these processes. Subsequent investigations should take into account the fact that implicit memory is likely to influence self-referential encoding and retrieval. Should these findings be replicated, it could potentially influence a broad base of theoretical work in cognitive psychology and neuroscience, as well as clinical work in the areas of: traumatic brain injury, certain psychiatric disorders, amnesia, age-related memory deficits, and anosognosia (unawareness of deficits).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSelfen_US
dc.subjectmemoryen_US
dc.subjectimpliciten_US
dc.subjectexpliciten_US
dc.subjectpsychometricen_US
dc.subjectretrievalen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFigueredo, Aurelio J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairFigueredo, Aurelio J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaniel, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, W. Jakeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2180en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747276en_US
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