Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195014
Title:
The Economics of News Content
Author:
Uscinski, Joe E.
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines media content. Specifically, I ask why the media reports the issues that it does. Many explanations have been provided in the past, including theories of journalistic integrity, media bias, and event-driven coverage. This dissertation further develops and tests the profit-seeking theory of news coverage. In this framework, news firms report stories that attract and hold the attention of the audience so as to increase market share of the audience.Chapter 2 reexamines the agenda setting hypothesis, asserting that much of the research that supported it relied upon inappropriate methodology and design to explain a temporal and cyclical phenomenon. To address these problems, I propose and test the profit-seeking theory of media content. In this, and contrary to the agenda-setting hypothesis, public issue salience drives issue content in the news, rather than issue content in the news driving public issue salience. Chapter 3 examines the affect of public opinion, specifically macropartisanship upon issue coverage in the news. As such, I ask if reporters follow the ebb and flow of mass opinion in deciding which issues are newsworthy and which are not. Chapter 4 asks if the public opinion affects the ability of institutional actors, specifically the president, to influence the media agenda.Findings indicate that public opinion does affect subsequent news coverage. The public's perception of the importance of some issues affects the amount of subsequent coverage of those issues. Changes in macropartisanship affect subsequent issue coverage in the news and public issue salience and presidential popularity affect the ability of the president to assert his agenda into the media.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
media; journalism; news; agenda; setting; effects
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jones, Bradford S; Westerland, Chad L.
Committee Chair:
Jones, Bradford S; Westerland, Chad L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Economics of News Contenten_US
dc.creatorUscinski, Joe E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorUscinski, Joe E.en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines media content. Specifically, I ask why the media reports the issues that it does. Many explanations have been provided in the past, including theories of journalistic integrity, media bias, and event-driven coverage. This dissertation further develops and tests the profit-seeking theory of news coverage. In this framework, news firms report stories that attract and hold the attention of the audience so as to increase market share of the audience.Chapter 2 reexamines the agenda setting hypothesis, asserting that much of the research that supported it relied upon inappropriate methodology and design to explain a temporal and cyclical phenomenon. To address these problems, I propose and test the profit-seeking theory of media content. In this, and contrary to the agenda-setting hypothesis, public issue salience drives issue content in the news, rather than issue content in the news driving public issue salience. Chapter 3 examines the affect of public opinion, specifically macropartisanship upon issue coverage in the news. As such, I ask if reporters follow the ebb and flow of mass opinion in deciding which issues are newsworthy and which are not. Chapter 4 asks if the public opinion affects the ability of institutional actors, specifically the president, to influence the media agenda.Findings indicate that public opinion does affect subsequent news coverage. The public's perception of the importance of some issues affects the amount of subsequent coverage of those issues. Changes in macropartisanship affect subsequent issue coverage in the news and public issue salience and presidential popularity affect the ability of the president to assert his agenda into the media.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmediaen_US
dc.subjectjournalismen_US
dc.subjectnewsen_US
dc.subjectagendaen_US
dc.subjectsettingen_US
dc.subjecteffectsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJones, Bradford Sen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWesterland, Chad L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairJones, Bradford Sen_US
dc.contributor.chairWesterland, Chad L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeighley, Janen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2234en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747403en_US
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