Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195011
Title:
Processing Speed as a Predictor of Poor Reading
Author:
Urso, Annmarie
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study had three main purposes. First, the relationship between Processing Speed (Gs) and poor word recognition skills was examined. Second, various formats of processing speed tests that measure different types of processing speed (i.e. naming facility, perceptual speed, semantic speed, attention and concentration) were administered to determine what aspects of Gs were more strongly correlated with word reading performance. Pearson correlations and coefficients of determination were used to evaluate the strength of the relationships and the shared variance. Third, the study sample was evaluated to determine what percentage of the poor readers participating in the study had slow processing speed.Forty-four students in grades 1-3, ages six- to ten-years old were administered the Woodcock-Johnson III Achievement reading tests of Letter-Word Identification, Reading Fluency, and Word Attack. The subjects were additionally administered the Woodcock-Johnson III Cognitive Abilities tests of Verbal Comprehension, Visual-Auditory Learning, Sound Blending, Visual Matching, Numbers Reversed, Decision Speed, Rapid Picture Naming, Pair Cancellation, and Cross Out.The results of the study indicated processing speed, as measured by the Gs Cluster score, was strongly correlated with word reading, r = .749, r2=.56. The Gs tests of Visual Matching, (r = .663, r2 = .44) and Decision Speed (r = .811, r2 = .66) were most strongly correlated with poor word reading skill. The Basic Reading Skills Cluster and the Test of Letter-Word Identification were both moderately correlated at various strengths with different formats of Gs tests. Tests of Visual Matching, Rapid Picture Naming, Pair Cancellation and Cross Out all had a moderate, significant correlation.Lastly, 47% of the poor readers (SS<85 on any of the measures of>reading) also had low Gs scores (SS<85).The results from the study demonstrate the need for further exploration of the impact of poor Gs on the development of reading skills, as well as determination of the most effective interventions for poor readers with slow processing speed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
processing speed; cognitive correlates of reading; reading disabilities; processing speed formats as predictors of reading achievement; CHC theory
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mather, Nancy
Committee Chair:
Mather, Nancy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleProcessing Speed as a Predictor of Poor Readingen_US
dc.creatorUrso, Annmarieen_US
dc.contributor.authorUrso, Annmarieen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study had three main purposes. First, the relationship between Processing Speed (Gs) and poor word recognition skills was examined. Second, various formats of processing speed tests that measure different types of processing speed (i.e. naming facility, perceptual speed, semantic speed, attention and concentration) were administered to determine what aspects of Gs were more strongly correlated with word reading performance. Pearson correlations and coefficients of determination were used to evaluate the strength of the relationships and the shared variance. Third, the study sample was evaluated to determine what percentage of the poor readers participating in the study had slow processing speed.Forty-four students in grades 1-3, ages six- to ten-years old were administered the Woodcock-Johnson III Achievement reading tests of Letter-Word Identification, Reading Fluency, and Word Attack. The subjects were additionally administered the Woodcock-Johnson III Cognitive Abilities tests of Verbal Comprehension, Visual-Auditory Learning, Sound Blending, Visual Matching, Numbers Reversed, Decision Speed, Rapid Picture Naming, Pair Cancellation, and Cross Out.The results of the study indicated processing speed, as measured by the Gs Cluster score, was strongly correlated with word reading, r = .749, r2=.56. The Gs tests of Visual Matching, (r = .663, r2 = .44) and Decision Speed (r = .811, r2 = .66) were most strongly correlated with poor word reading skill. The Basic Reading Skills Cluster and the Test of Letter-Word Identification were both moderately correlated at various strengths with different formats of Gs tests. Tests of Visual Matching, Rapid Picture Naming, Pair Cancellation and Cross Out all had a moderate, significant correlation.Lastly, 47% of the poor readers (SS<85 on any of the measures of>reading) also had low Gs scores (SS<85).The results from the study demonstrate the need for further exploration of the impact of poor Gs on the development of reading skills, as well as determination of the most effective interventions for poor readers with slow processing speed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectprocessing speeden_US
dc.subjectcognitive correlates of readingen_US
dc.subjectreading disabilitiesen_US
dc.subjectprocessing speed formats as predictors of reading achievementen_US
dc.subjectCHC theoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMather, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.chairMather, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLiaupsin, Carlen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOfiesh, Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFletcher, Todden_US
dc.identifier.proquest2640en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749631en_US
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