The Efficacy of a Systematic Process for Designing Function-Based Interventions for Adults in a Community Setting

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195006
Title:
The Efficacy of a Systematic Process for Designing Function-Based Interventions for Adults in a Community Setting
Author:
Underwood, Martha Anne
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Function-based Intervention Decision Model (Umbreit, Ferro, Liaupsin, & Lane, 2007) (Decision Model), is a straightforward technique to link the function of a behavior to an intervention. Although this technique has been found to be significantly effective with school-age disability populations, it has not been tested with adults who have cognitive disabilities and significant behavioral problems in non-school settings.This study explored the efficacy of the Decision Model (Umbreit et al., 2007) as a method for matching behavioral interventions to assessed function(s) of the target behavior by extending its practices to adults with developmental disabilities in a community-based day program. The participants were three adults with moderate mental retardation and problematic behavior, displayed by inappropriate social interactions. The research design was a multiple baseline across subjects. A notable benefit to this design is that there was no need to withdraw treatment, an important ethical consideration because each of the problem behaviors presented with some form of self-injury, aggression to others, and/or property destruction. The study had four phases: (a) conducting the functional behavioral assessment to identify the function of the participant's problem behavior, (b) utilizing the Decision Model (Umbreit et al., 2007) to link the function to the behavioral intervention plan (BIP), (c) applying the intervention, and (d) and maintenance. Several research questions were posed: (a) Do interventions developed using the Decision Model produce positive results for adults who have developmental disabilities and significant behavior problems in a non-school setting? (b) Will the application and maintenance of each BIP result in decreased exhibition of assessed problem behaviors? (c) Will the application and maintenance of each BIP result in increased exhibition of identified replacement behaviors? (d) Will the day program support staff and behavioral support team view the outcomes as socially valid? The results indicated a decrease in problem behaviors (socially inappropriate interactions) and an increase in replacement behaviors (socially appropriate interactions). Results of this study influenced positive intervention strategies that were easily maintained and viewed as socially valid by the direct support staff, evidenced by the results of the Treatment Acceptability Rating Form-Revised (Reimers, Wacker, Cooper, & DeRaad, 1992).
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Function-Based Intervention; Function-Based Decision Model; Adults with Developmental Disabilities; Community Setting
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Umbreit, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Efficacy of a Systematic Process for Designing Function-Based Interventions for Adults in a Community Settingen_US
dc.creatorUnderwood, Martha Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorUnderwood, Martha Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Function-based Intervention Decision Model (Umbreit, Ferro, Liaupsin, & Lane, 2007) (Decision Model), is a straightforward technique to link the function of a behavior to an intervention. Although this technique has been found to be significantly effective with school-age disability populations, it has not been tested with adults who have cognitive disabilities and significant behavioral problems in non-school settings.This study explored the efficacy of the Decision Model (Umbreit et al., 2007) as a method for matching behavioral interventions to assessed function(s) of the target behavior by extending its practices to adults with developmental disabilities in a community-based day program. The participants were three adults with moderate mental retardation and problematic behavior, displayed by inappropriate social interactions. The research design was a multiple baseline across subjects. A notable benefit to this design is that there was no need to withdraw treatment, an important ethical consideration because each of the problem behaviors presented with some form of self-injury, aggression to others, and/or property destruction. The study had four phases: (a) conducting the functional behavioral assessment to identify the function of the participant's problem behavior, (b) utilizing the Decision Model (Umbreit et al., 2007) to link the function to the behavioral intervention plan (BIP), (c) applying the intervention, and (d) and maintenance. Several research questions were posed: (a) Do interventions developed using the Decision Model produce positive results for adults who have developmental disabilities and significant behavior problems in a non-school setting? (b) Will the application and maintenance of each BIP result in decreased exhibition of assessed problem behaviors? (c) Will the application and maintenance of each BIP result in increased exhibition of identified replacement behaviors? (d) Will the day program support staff and behavioral support team view the outcomes as socially valid? The results indicated a decrease in problem behaviors (socially inappropriate interactions) and an increase in replacement behaviors (socially appropriate interactions). Results of this study influenced positive intervention strategies that were easily maintained and viewed as socially valid by the direct support staff, evidenced by the results of the Treatment Acceptability Rating Form-Revised (Reimers, Wacker, Cooper, & DeRaad, 1992).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectFunction-Based Interventionen_US
dc.subjectFunction-Based Decision Modelen_US
dc.subjectAdults with Developmental Disabilitiesen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Settingen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChalfant, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLiaupsin, Carlen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2108en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747330en_US
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