Structure-Function Relationships in Microviridae External Scaffolding Proteins

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195001
Title:
Structure-Function Relationships in Microviridae External Scaffolding Proteins
Author:
Uchiyama, Asako
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Microviruses (canonical members: øX174, G4, and alpha3) are T=1 icosahedral virions with a two scaffolding protein-mediated assembly pathway. The external scaffolding protein D mainly mediates the assembly of coat protein pentamers into procapsids. The results of previous genetic studies suggest that helix 1 of D protein may act as a substrate specificity domain, mediating the initial coat-scaffolding protein recognition in a species-specific manner. In an effort to elucidate a more mechanistic model, chimeric external scaffolding proteins were initially constructed in a plasmid, which over-expresses the protein, between the closely related phages G4 and øX174. The results of biochemical and genetic analyses identify coat-scaffolding domains needed to initiate procapsid formation and provide more evidence, albeit indirect, that the pores are the site of DNA entry during the packaging reaction.However, protein concentrations higher than those found in typical infections could drive reactions that may not occur under physiological conditions. In order to elucidate a more detailed mechanistic model, the same chimeric external scaffolding gene was placed directly in the øX174 genome, and the chimeric virus was characterized. The results of the genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that helix 1 most likely mediates the nucleation reaction for the formation of the first assembly intermediate containing the external scaffolding protein. Mutants that can more efficiently use the chimeric scaffolding protein were isolated. These second-site mutations appear to act on a kinetic level, shortening the lag phase before virion production.Finally, by using improved protocols, two novel early assembly intermediates, the 9S* and 12S* particles, have been isolated and characterized. The 9S* particle consists of a coat protein pentamer associated with the internal scaffolding protein. The 12S* intermediate is a complex of a 9S* particle with the major spike protein, and the DNA pilot protein. The existence of internal scaffolding and DNA pilot proteins that were absent in previously characterized intermediates suggest that 9S* and 12S* particles are biologically active intermediates. Moreover, preliminary in vitro assembly experiments performed with the 12S* particle and exogenous external scaffolding protein yield empty capsids-like particle, strongly suggesting that these are the physiologically relevant intermediates.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
phix174; bacteriophage; virus assembly; scaffolding protein
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Microbiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Fane, Bentley A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleStructure-Function Relationships in Microviridae External Scaffolding Proteinsen_US
dc.creatorUchiyama, Asakoen_US
dc.contributor.authorUchiyama, Asakoen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMicroviruses (canonical members: øX174, G4, and alpha3) are T=1 icosahedral virions with a two scaffolding protein-mediated assembly pathway. The external scaffolding protein D mainly mediates the assembly of coat protein pentamers into procapsids. The results of previous genetic studies suggest that helix 1 of D protein may act as a substrate specificity domain, mediating the initial coat-scaffolding protein recognition in a species-specific manner. In an effort to elucidate a more mechanistic model, chimeric external scaffolding proteins were initially constructed in a plasmid, which over-expresses the protein, between the closely related phages G4 and øX174. The results of biochemical and genetic analyses identify coat-scaffolding domains needed to initiate procapsid formation and provide more evidence, albeit indirect, that the pores are the site of DNA entry during the packaging reaction.However, protein concentrations higher than those found in typical infections could drive reactions that may not occur under physiological conditions. In order to elucidate a more detailed mechanistic model, the same chimeric external scaffolding gene was placed directly in the øX174 genome, and the chimeric virus was characterized. The results of the genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that helix 1 most likely mediates the nucleation reaction for the formation of the first assembly intermediate containing the external scaffolding protein. Mutants that can more efficiently use the chimeric scaffolding protein were isolated. These second-site mutations appear to act on a kinetic level, shortening the lag phase before virion production.Finally, by using improved protocols, two novel early assembly intermediates, the 9S* and 12S* particles, have been isolated and characterized. The 9S* particle consists of a coat protein pentamer associated with the internal scaffolding protein. The 12S* intermediate is a complex of a 9S* particle with the major spike protein, and the DNA pilot protein. The existence of internal scaffolding and DNA pilot proteins that were absent in previously characterized intermediates suggest that 9S* and 12S* particles are biologically active intermediates. Moreover, preliminary in vitro assembly experiments performed with the 12S* particle and exogenous external scaffolding protein yield empty capsids-like particle, strongly suggesting that these are the physiologically relevant intermediates.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectphix174en_US
dc.subjectbacteriophageen_US
dc.subjectvirus assemblyen_US
dc.subjectscaffolding proteinen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFane, Bentley A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCollins, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBesselsen, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMontfort, Williamen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2126en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747234en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.